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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Opposing Sherman's advance to Atlanta. (search)
the Army of Tennessee by a telegram received December 18th, 1863, in the camp of Ross's brigade of cavalry near Bolton. I assumed that command at Dalton on the 27th, and received there, on the 1st of January, a letter from the President dated December 23d, purporting to be instructions. In it he, in Richmond, informed me of the encouraging condition of the army, which induced him to hope that I would soon be able to commence active operations against the enemy,--the men being tolerably well umbers and condition. On pages 548-9, Vol. II. of his work, The rise and fall of the Confederate Government, he dwells upon his successful efforts to increase its numbers and means adequately. After the strange assertions and suggestions of December 23d, he did not resume the subject of military operations until, in a letter of February 27th to him through his staff-officer General Bragg, I pointed out the necessity of great preparations to take the offensive, such as large additions to the n
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Navy at Fort Fisher. (search)
ads, including the New Ironsides, besides the three largest of our steam-frigates, viz., the Minnesota, Colorado, and Wabash. The fleet arrived in sight of the fort on the morning of December 20th. The total number of guns and howitzers in the fleet was over 600, and the total weight of projectiles at a single discharge of all the guns (both broadsides) was over 22 tons.--editors. A novel feature of this first attack was the explosion of a powder-boat near the fort on the night of December 23d. The vessel was the Louisiana, an old gun-boat no longer serviceable. The more sanguine believed that Fort Fisher, with its garrison, guns, and equipment, would be leveled to the ground, while others were equally certain it would prove a fizzle. Commander A. C. Rhind, with a crew of volunteers, successfully performed the perilous duty, and, applying the match at midnight, the crew rowed safely away to the Wilderness, a swift gun-boat, in waiting. The whole fleet having moved off shore
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sherman's advance from Atlanta. (search)
bridge, over 1000 feet long, near King's house. Hazen, ready at the bridge, then marched over and took Fort McAllister by assault, There seem to have been but 230 men in the work. Hazen's loss was 24 killed and 110 wounded.--editors. which Sherman and I witnessed from the rice mill, some miles away on the other bank of the Ogeechee. Now we connected with the navy, and our supplies flowed in abundantly, Slocum soon put a force beyond the Savannah. Hardee, fearing to be penned up, abandoned his works and fled during the night before Slocum had seized his last road to the east. On December 23d the campaign culminated as Sherman entered Savannah. He sent the following dispatch to President Lincoln, which he received Christmas Eve: I beg to present to you, as a Christmas gift, the city of Savannah, with one hundred and fifty heavy guns and plenty of ammunition, and also about twenty-five thousand bales of cotton. Sherman's Army leaving Atlanta. From a sketch made at the time.