Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for December 24th or search for December 24th in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War Diary of Capt. Robert Emory Park, Twelfth Alabama Regiment. January 28th, 1863January 27th, 1864. (search)
rs. We were to be silent on the march to avoid posting the enemy as to our movement. Dec. 21 and 22. Had my colored cooks, Ben and Banks, busy building a pole and dirt chimney to my tent, as I shall remain in my tent all winter. Dec. 23 and 24. Moved into my tent. Private Ben Ingram returned to duty. Sent Hon. David Clopton, M. C. (our first quartermaster, and once a private in my company), affidavits from widow of John Preskitt. Christmas Eve in the army bears no resemblance to the Christmas Eve in the army bears no resemblance to the preparations at home for Christmas festivities. Dec. 25. Christmas Day. Ate a hearty dinner, minus the home turkey and cranberries and oysters, egg nogg and fruit cake, and then wrote to my mother and sisters. Ordered on fatigue duty tomorrow at 8 1/2 o'clock. Sorry, because the men are busy completing their log cabins. Dec. 26. Lieutenant Wright left for home, and carried my Sharp's rifle. At 9 o'clock Major Proskauer led the regiment towards Paine's Mills, where we were to relieve th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), William Henry Chase Whiting, Major-General C. S. Army. (search)
and manly as if anticipating a parade. What nobler women can be found in all history, than the matrons of the Old North State, who, with their prayers and tears, sent forth their darlings in a cause they believed to be right, and in defence of their homes? Self-sacrificing courage seems indigenous to North Carolina. No breast is too tender for this heroic virtue. The first life-blood that stained the sands of Confederate Point, was from one of these youthful patriots. Saturday (Christmas eve), Colonel Lamb says, was almost an Indian summer day, and the deep blue sea was as calm as a lake. With the rising sun out of the ocean, there came upon the horizon, one after another, the vessels of the fleet, numbering more than fifty men-of-war; the grand frigates led the van, followed by the ironclads. At 9 o'clock the men were beat to quarters, and silently stood by their guns. * * * The Minnesota, Colorado and Wabash came grandly on, floating fortresses, each mounting more