Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for December 25th or search for December 25th in all documents.

Your search returned 57 results in 16 document sections:

1 2
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Amnesty proclamations. (search)
ixed. Done at the city of Washington, the fourth day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight, and of the Independence of the United States of America the ninety-third. Andrew Johnson. The second, issued Dec. 25, proclaimed unconditionally a full pardon and amnesty. It was as follows: Whereas, the President of the United States has heretofore set forth several proclamations offering amnesty and pardon to persons who had been or were concerned in restoration of all rights, privileges, and immunities under the Constitution and the laws which have been made in pursuance thereof. In testimony whereof I have signed these presents with my hand, and have caused the seal of the United States to be hereunto affixed. Done at the city of Washington, the twenty-fifth day of December, in the year of our Lord. one thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight, and of the Independence of the United States of America the ninety-third. Andrew Johnson.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chickasaw Bayou, battle of (search)
Chickasaw Bayou, battle of When Gen. W. T. Sherman came down from Memphis to engage in the siege of Vicksburg, late in 1862, with about 20,000 men and some heavy siege guns, he was joined by troops from Helena, Ark., and was met by a gunboat fleet, under Admiral Porter, at the mouth of the Yazoo River, just above the city (Dec. 25). The two commanders arranged a plan for attacking Vicksburg in the rear. They went up the Yazoo to capture some batteries at Chickasaw Bayou and other points. The Yazoo sweeps round in a great bend within a few miles of Vicksburg. The range of hills on which Vicksburg stands extends to the Yazoo, about 12 miles above the city, where they terminate in Haines's Bluff. There is a deep natural ditch extending from the Yazoo below Haines's Bluff to the Mississippi, called Chickasaw Bayou, passing near the bluffs, which were fortified, and along their bases were rifle-pits for sharp-shooters. This bayou lay in the path of Sherman's march up the bluf
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Delaware River, Washington's passage of the. (search)
Delaware River, Washington's passage of the. At the close of November, 1776, the British occupied New Jersey, and only the Delaware River shut off Cornwallis from Philadelphia. On Dec. 2, Washington, with a considerable force, crossed the river, securing every boat so that the British were unable to follow him. Determined to surprise the Hessians, under Colonel Rahl, at Trenton, Washington recrossed the river a few miles above Trenton on Dec. 25, with 2,400 men and twenty pieces of artillery. Owing to the darkness and the floating ice it was 4 A. M. on the 26th before the entire force had crossed. General Knox, the constant companion of Washington throughout the war, had crossed the river before it became choked with ice, and during the night that Washington and his party recrossed it, Knox stood on the opposite shore, and by shouting indicated to Washington where a landing could be safely made. See Trenton, battle of.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hale, Edward Everett 1822- (search)
Hale, Edward Everett 1822- Clergyman; born in Boston, April 3, 1822; graduated at Harvard College in 1839; studied theology and became minister of the Church of the Unity, Worcester, Mass., in Edward Everett Hale. 1846, where he remained till 1856, when he became minister of the South church (Unitarian), Boston. In May, 1899, he resigned his pastorate after a service of forty-three years. He is the author of The man without a country; Ten times One is ten; Margaret Percival in America; In his name; Mr. Tangiers' vacations; Mrs. Merriam's scholars; His level best; Ups and Downs; Fortunes of Rachel; Four and five; Crusoe in New York; Christmas eve and Christmas day; Our Christmas in a Palace; Sketches in Christian history; Kansas and Nebraska; What career? boys' heroes; Sybaris, and other homes; For fifty years; A New England boyhood; Chautauquan history of the United States, etc. See lend-A-hand clubs
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Holidays, legal. (search)
y 4, first Monday in September, Thanksgiving, Dec. 25, general election. Connecticut. Jan. 1,y 4, first Monday in September, Thanksgiving, Dec. 25, general election. Georgia. Jan. 1 and ast, first Monday in September, Thanksgiving, Dec. 25, general election. Louisiana. Jan. 1 any 4, first Monday in September, Thanksgiving, Dec. 25. Michigan. Jan. 1, Feb. 22, May 30, July 4, first Monday in September, Thanksgiving, Dec. 25, general election. Mississippi. July 4,y 4, first Monday in September, Thanksgiving, Dec. 25, general election. Montana. Jan. 1, Feby 4, first Monday in September, Thanksgiving, Dec. 25, general election. New Jersey. Jan. 1, Monday in September, Thanksgiving, Fast Day, Dec. 25, general election, every Saturday afternoon. y 4, first Monday in September, Thanksgiving, Dec. 25, general election. Oregon. Jan. 1, Feb. April 21, July 4, first Monday in September, Dec. 25, days of fasting and thanksgiving, election d[31 more...]
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hutchings, William 1764- (search)
e destruction of the British fleet, his father, who refused to take the oath of allegiance to the crown, retired to New Castle, where he remained until the close of the war. At the age of fifteen, having acquired a man's stature, William entered the Continental army. He enlisted in a regiment of Massachusetts militia commanded by Col. Samuel McCobb, Capt. Benjamin Lemont's company, as a volunteer for six months. That was in the spring of 1780 or 1781; and he was honorably discharged about Christmas, the same year, at Cox's Head, at the mouth of the Kennebec River. He received an annual pension of $21.60 until 1865, when an annual gratuity of $300 was granted by Congress to each of the five Revolutionary soldiers then supposed to be living. Only four of the number lived to receive this gratuity. William Hutchings and Lemuel Cook were the last. In 1865, when over 100 years of age, he received an invitation from the city authorities of Bangor to join in the celebration of the Fo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Moravians. (search)
r settlement and went to Pennsylvania with Whitefield. Bishops Nitschmann and Spangenberg returned to Europe. Whitefield had purchased lands at the forks of the Delaware, and invited the Moravians to settle upon them; but doctrinal differences produced a rupture between them and Whitefield, and he ordered them to leave his domain forthwith (see Whitefield, George). Bishop Nitschmann came back, and founded a settlement on the Lehigh, the first house being completed in 1741. When, on Christmas day, Count Zinzendorf visited the settlement, he called it Bethlehem. That is the mother-church in America. Their labors among the Indians were extended far and wide, and their principal station in the West was at Gnadenhutten— tents of grace —in Ohio, where many Indian converts were gathered, and where nearly 100 of them were massacred by white people in March, 1782, under the false impression that they were British spies or were concerned in some Indian outrages in Pennsylvania. The fir
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Orleans. (search)
the order, and, without waiting to know whether suspicions of its intentions were well founded, he placed a military guard at the door of the legislative hall and broke up the session. Remains of Rodriguez's Canal in 1861. Jackson's victory in 1814-15. The battle at Villereas plantation (Dec. 23, 1814) dispirited the British invaders, and in this condition Lieut.-Gen. Edward Pakenham, the hero of Salamanca, and one of Wellington's veteran officers, found them on his arrival on Christmas Day, with reinforcements, to take chief command. He was delighted to find under his command some of the best of Wellington's troops that fought on the Spanish Peninsula. He immediately prepared to effect the capture of New Orleans and the subjugation of Louisiana without delay. While Jackson was casting up intrenchments along the line of Rodriguez's Canal, from the Mississippi back to an impassable swamp 2 miles away, the British were as busy too. They worked day and night in the erection
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Philippine Islands, (search)
hwan's column operated in the southern part of Luzon and captured Rosario and Malabon. Nov. 2. The Philippine commission appointed by the President, consisting of J. G. Schurman, Prof. Dean Worcester, Charles Denby, Admiral Dewey, and General Otis, which began its labors at Manila, March 20, and returned to the United States in September, submitted its preliminary report to the President. Nov. 7. A military expedition on board transports, under General Wheaton, captured Dagupan. Dec. 25. Gen. S. B. M. Young appointed military governor of northwestern Luzon. Dec. 26. The Filipino general Santa Ana, with a force of insurgents, attacked the garrison at Subig; the Americans successfully repelled the attack. Dec. 27. Colonel Lockett, with a force of 2,500 men, attacked a force of insurgents near Montalban; many Filipinos were killed. Jan. 1, 1900. General advance of the American troops in southern Luzon; Cabuyac, on Laguna de Bay, taken by two battalions of the 39th
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Quebec. (search)
ty, and set a few buildings on fire. Some round-shot from the citadel shivered Lamb's ice-battery and compelled him to withdraw. Then Montgomery waited a fortnight for expected reinforcements, but in vain. The terms of enlistment of some of his men had almost expired, and the deadly smallpox appeared among them. Quarrels between Arnold and several of his officers alienated some of the troops, and it appeared at one time as if a dissolution of the little invading army was imminent. On Christmas Montgomery determined to try and carry the city by assault at two points simultaneously, one division to be under his own command, the other to be led by Arnold. It was determined to undertake the task on the next stormy night. Arnold to attack the lower town in the gloom, setting fire to the suburb of St. Roque, while the main body under Montgomery should make the attack on the St. Lawrence side of the town. A snowstorm began (Dec. 30), and, notwithstanding sickness and desertion had r
1 2