Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for December 27th or search for December 27th in all documents.

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Dec. 27. A meeting of the citizens of Pittsburgh, Pa., was held, to give expression to the public indignation created by the removal of ordnance to the Southern forts. General William Robinson presided. Resolutions were adopted, declaring loyalty to the Union, deprecating any interference with the shipment of arms under government orders, however inopportune or impolitic the order might appear; deploring the existing state of things in connection with the administration of important departments of the public service, so as to have shaken confidence in the people of the free States; that, while Pennsylvania is on guard at the Federal capital, it is her special duty to look to the fidelity of her sons, and in that view call on the President as a citizen of this Commonwealth, to see that the public receive no detriment at his hands. It behooves the President to purge his cabinet of every man known to give aid and comfort to, or in any way countenancing the revolt of any State ag
December 25. Two spans of a bridge across the Charleston River, Mo., on the Hannibal and St. Joseph's Railroad, were burned by the rebels this night.--Cincinnati Enquirer, December 27. This day about noon, the stout gunboat Florida, C. S. N., concluded to celebrate Christmas eve by a small set — to with the insolent Lincoln cruiser New London, which was lying off the mouth of the harbor of Mobile, Ala, The Florida ran down to the westward of Sand Island, and challenged the New London to come on, which she did, and for an hour or two a lively cannonade at long two furnished an excitingly interesting exhibition for the entertainment of the great audience which viewed it — the four thousand men who garrison Forts Morgan and Gaines, as well as the crews of the blockading vessels, being the spectators. The Florida could not come to close quarters with the enemy by reason of the shoal water of a bar intervening, and could she have got out it is likely she would have had more th
. Berry presented them with a stand of colors.--The First battalion of the First Massachusetts Cavalry, numbering four hundred and fifty men, arrived at New York, and left for Annapolis in the afternoon, to join Gen. Burnside's expedition. The steamer Arago arrived at New York from Europe, bringing as a passenger Lieut.-Gen. Winfield Scott, and intelligence that the party in Europe advocating a war with the United States, was greatly encouraged in their cry for blood. --N. Y. Herald, December 27. First Lieutenant J. C. Ives, Topographical Engineers, U. S. A., having tendered his resignation under circumstances showing him to be disloyal to the U. S. Government, was, by direction of the President, dismissed the service from this date.--General Orders, No. 110. The rebel general, John B. Floyd, issued an address to the troops under his command, dated at the camp, near Dublin depot, Western Virginia, in which he expressed his admiration of the manner in which they had cond
December 27. Intelligence was received at Washington that Col. Canby, in command of the military department of New Mexico, had retaken Forts Craig and Stanton, on the Masilla border, driving the Texans away, and was on the way to Fort Fillmore to dispossess the rebels at that post, which was traitorously surrendered by Colonel Lynde to an inferior force of Texans. Thence he intended marching into Arizona to drive off the rebels.--The Legislature of New Mexico met on the 2d of December. Governor Connelly, in his message, recommended active measures with reference to the Indians who had been tampered with by Albert Pike, suggesting that they be located on the reservations, and encouraged in agricultural pursuits. The Indians, for the greater part, were peaceable and friendly to the United States Government.--Philadelphia Press, Dec. 28. The burning of buildings near New Market Bridge, Va., by order of Brigadier-General Mansfield, called forth the following order from Gener
December 27. Elizabethtown, Ky., was this day captured by the rebel forces, under General J. H. Morgan, after a short resistance by the Union garrison of the post, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel H. S. Smith. An immense amount of public and private property was destroyed and carried off by the rebel troops.--(Docs. 52 and 88.) A fight took place at Dumfries, Va., between the garrison of the town, consisting of three infantry regiments, a section of a field-battery, and a regiment of cavalry, under the command of Colonel Charles Candy, and the rebel forces of Generals Stuart and Fitz-Hugh Lee, with a battery of artillery, in all about three thousand five hundred men, resulting, after a desperate conflict of several hours' duration, in a retreat of the rebel forces with great loss.--(Doc. 89.) Yesterday the expeditionary army, under General Sherman, successfully disembarked near the mouth of the Yazoo River, and to-day marched on Vicksburgh.--(Doc. 91.) To
January 3. Captain William Gwin, of the United States gunboat Benton, died this evening of the wounds he received in the action near Vicksburgh, Miss., on the twenty-seventh of December last.--A volunteer cavalry company, under the command of Captain J. Sewell Reid, arrived at New York from California, on the way to Massachusetts, in order to join the Second cavalry of that State. They were raised in San Francisco, and represented nearly every loyal State in the Union.--Murfreesboro, Tenn., was evacuated by the rebels.--(Doc. 26.) Last night a portion of the command of General Washburne's cavalry left camp at Helena, Ark., and in a terrific storm of wind and rain, proceeded to a point near La Grange, where, at daylight this morning, they dashed upon a camp of rebel cavalry, and succeeded in scattering them through the woods and destroying their camp, besides capturing ten men and two officers, and killing and wounding ten others.--General Gorman's Despatch. Early this
December 27. General McPherson, from his headquarters, Seventeenth army corps, at Vicksburgh, Miss., issued the following circular: The following named persons: Miss Kate Barnett, Miss Ella Barrett, Miss Laura Latham, Miss Ellen Martin, and Mrs. Moore, having acted disrespectfully towards the President and Government of the United States, and having insulted officers, soldiers, and loyal citizens of the United States who had assembled at the Episcopal church in Vicksburgh, on Christmas-day, for divine service, by abruptly leaving said church at that point in the service where the President of the United States and all others in authority are prayed for, are hereby banished, and will leave the Federal lines within forty-eight hours, under penalty of imprisonment. Hereafter all persons, male or female, who by word or deed or by implication, do insult or show disrespect to the President, the Government, or the flag of the United States, or to any officer or soldier of the