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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 46 46 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 7 7 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 2 2 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, Benjamin L. D'Ooge, M. Grant Daniell, Commentary on Caesar's Gallic War 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 100 BC or search for 100 BC in all documents.

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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, CARCER (search)
onstructors of the upper chamber; Tenney Frank (TF 39- 47) now supposes, without sufficient reason, that the lower chamber originally had a flat wooden roof, which later served as a scaffolding for the flat stone vault, which dates from after 100 B.C. But the holes to which he points in support of this theory may just as well have been cut for this scaffolding. There is little doubt that the chamber was originally circular (the statement that the straight chord on the side towards the Co regularity of the blocks, uniformly 56 cm. high: while the date of the drain leading into the forum appears to be debateable. The upper room is a vaulted trapezoid, the sides varying in length from 5 to 3.60 metres. This Frank assigns to about 100 B.C. on similar grounds; and the vault of the lower chamber, as we have seen, to a slightly later date. A new facade of travertine was added by C. Vibius Rufinus and M. Cocceius Nerva, consules suffecti, perhaps in 22 A.D. (CILvi. 1539=31674;
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, CLOACA MAXIMA (search)
found to be built of blocks of travertine and was as much as 10 metres below ground. A part of it, belonging to the republican period, with later restorations, is still visible opposite the church of S. Giorgio in Velabro. It has recently been connected with the main sewer of modern Rome, so that the forum can no longer be inundated by its backwash (aliquando Tiberis retro infusus recipitur, as Pliny says), as it was, for the last time, in the flood of 1901: Vidimus flavum Tiberim retortis litore Etrusco violenter undis ire deiectum monumenta regis templaque Vestae (Hor. Carm. i. 2. 13). The three concentric arches at the mouth of it, which show a combination of Gabine stone and Grotta Oscura stone, are assigned to 100 B.C. or slightly before (TF 142, n. 9; ASA 5; cf. Ill. 43). See Jord. i. I. 441-443; 447-452 ; Richter, Ant. Denk. i. 37; Narducci, Fognatura di Roma 39-49; BC 1890, 95-102; Mitt. 1889, 236; 1891, 86-88; LR 29 sq.; P1. 107-109; 271-273; CR 1900, 137-138; ZA 262- 265.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, L. APPULEIUS SATURNINUS, DOMUS (search)
L. APPULEIUS SATURNINUS, DOMUS destroyed, like that of M. Fulvius Flaccus, after the murder of its owner, who was tribune in 103 and 100 B.C. (Val. Max. vi. 3. 1 c). Its site is unknown.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, ISIS ATHENODORIA (search)
ISIS ATHENODORIA mentioned only in the Notitia (Reg. XII), and presumably a statue of Isis by the Greek artist Athenodorus (c. 100 B.C.), which may perhaps have given its name to a shrine in which it was placed. The site of the monument was probably near the baths of Caracalla and the via Appia, but fragments of sculpture found in this vicinity cannot be identified with certainty (HJ 197 ; Gilb. iii. 112 ; BC 1914, 351-352; RE ii. 2047; ix. 2132, and literature there cited).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PAGUS IANICULENSIS (search)
PAGUS IANICULENSIS a name for the district on the right bank of the Tiber while it was still organised as a pagus. It is found only in two inscriptions of about 100 B.C., one in a pavement of opus signinum (CIL i². 1000, 10011 =vi. 2219, 2220) discovered near S. Maria dell' Orto (Jord. i. I. 278; Mommsen, Staatsrecht, iii. 114, 115; DS iv. 273-276).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
138Temple of Mars in Circus Flaminius, 328. 125Aqua Tepula built, 27. 123Vestal dedicates shrine of Bona Dea Subsaxana, 85. 121Temple of Concord restored, 138. Basilica Opimia built, 81, 232. Fornix Fabianus, 211. 117Temple of Castor restored, 103. 115of Fides restored, 209. of Mens restored, 339. 114of Venus Verticordia, 554. 111of Magna Mater burnt and rebuilt, 324, 377. 110Porticus Minucia paved, 424. 102Porticus Catuli built, 421. 101Temple of Fortuna huiusce diei vowed, 216. 100(ca.). Horrea Galbae, 261. (ca.). Arch at mouth of Cloaca Maxima, 127. (ca.). Upper room of Carcer, ioo. Marius: Trophies of victory in Area Capitolina, 49, 541; builds Temple of Honos and Virtus Mariana, 259. 93Part of the Capitoline hill sold, 97. 91Temple of Pietas struck by lightning, 389. 90Juno Sospita restored, 291. (ca.). Two temples in Forum Holitorium, 277, 278. 87(ca.). Gateway in Palazzo Antonelli (?), 355. 83Capitoline Temple burnt, 299. 82-79Rule of Sulla: he exten