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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 13 13 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
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Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White), THE CIVIL WARS, CHAPTER IV (search)
considered this also the source of new seditions or because he thought it not altogether desirable that the Romans should become accustomed to Grecian pleasures. The censor, Quintus Cæcelius Metellus, attempted to degrade Glaucia, a senator, and Apuleius Saturninus, who had already been a tribune, on account of their disgraceful mode of life, but was not able to do so because his colleague Y.R. 653 would not agree to it. Accordingly Saturninus, a B.C. 101 little later, in order to have revenge on Metellus, became a candidate for the tribuneship again, seizing the occasion when Glaucia held the office of prætor and presided over the election of the tribunes; but Nonius, a man of noble birth, who used much plainness of speech in reference to Saturninus and reproached Glaucia bitterly, was chosen for the office. As they feared lest he should punish them as tribune, they made a rush upon him with a crowd of
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK IV. AN ACCOUNT OF COUNTRIES, NATIONS, SEAS, TOWNS, HAVENS, MOUNTAINS, RIVERS, DISTANCES, AND PEOPLES WHO NOW EXIST OR FORMERLY EXISTED., CHAP. 28.—GERMANY. (search)
Visigoths, upon the Roman power during its decline, are too well known to every reader of Gibbon to require further notice.: the Ingævones, forming a second race, a portion of whom are the CimbriThe inhabitants of Chersonesus Cimbrica, the modern peninsula of Jutland. It seems doubtful whether these Cimbri were a Germanic nation or a Celtic tribe, as also whether they were the same race whose numerous hordes successively defeated six Roman armies, and were finally conquered by C. Marius, B.C. 101, in the Campi Raudii. The more general impression, however, entertained by historians, is that they were a Celtic or Gallic and not a Germanic nation. The name is said to have signified "robbers." See Gibbon, i. 273, iii. 365. Bohn's Ed., the TeutoniThe Teutoni or Teutones dwelt on the coasts of the Baltic, adjacent to the territory of the Cimbri. Their name, though belonging originally to a single nation or tribe, came to be afterwards applied collectively to the whole people of Germany. See
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., chapter 17 (search)
opto, pray. Observe the adroit union of compliment and threat in this passage, which at the same time forms the transition to the appeal to the praetor presiding. Appeal to Glabrio, the presiding praetor, to prevent bribery. is: referring to the Senate. judicio: abl. of means. qui sis, what sort of man you are. reddere,pay back. fac . . . veniat: § 565 (33I, f, R.); cf. B. 295, 8; G. 553, I (end); H. 565, 4 (499, 2); H.-B. 502, 3, footnote 2 legis Aciliae:this (probably B.C. 101) provided that there should be neither ampliatio (further hearing) nor comperendinatio (see note on sect. 34, p. 40, l. 18) in cases of repetundae. All earlier laws were superseded by the Cornelian law of Sulla. Summae auctoritates, strongest influences, especially family traditions, etc. To the Roman mind an auctor, in this sense, was a pattern for imitation. quae . . . non sinant: best regarded as a purpose clause; cf. § 531. 2, N. (317, N.). ut ne quis, etc.: § 537,a, N. (319, a, N.);
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., Chapter 2 (search)
Appeal to Glabrio, the presiding praetor, to prevent bribery. is: referring to the Senate. judicio: abl. of means. qui sis, what sort of man you are. reddere,pay back. fac . . . veniat: § 565 (33I, f, R.); cf. B. 295, 8; G. 553, I (end); H. 565, 4 (499, 2); H.-B. 502, 3, footnote 2 legis Aciliae:this (probably B.C. 101) provided that there should be neither ampliatio (further hearing) nor comperendinatio (see note on sect. 34, p. 40, l. 18) in cases of repetundae. All earlier laws were superseded by the Cornelian law of Sulla. Summae auctoritates, strongest influences, especially family traditions, etc. To the Roman mind an auctor, in this sense, was a pattern for imitation. quae . . . non sinant: best regarded as a purpose clause; cf. § 531. 2, N. (317, N.). ut ne quis, etc.: § 537,a, N. (319, a, N.); G. 545,R.1; H.(499,1); cf. H.-B. 502, 3, a, footnote 2. nocenti reo,etc., for the accused, if guilty, his great wealth has had more weight to increase (lit. towards)
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., chapter 10 (search)
r of the younger Africanus, and, like his son, the most eminent and upright man of his generation. He brought the Third Macedonian War to a close by the battle of Pydna, B.C. 168, and led King Perseus captive in his triumphal procession. currum [triumphalem]: the captives did not go with or behind the triumphal chariot, but preceded it in the procession. bis liberavit: by the victories over the German invaders, —over the Teutones at Aquae Sextiae (B.C. 102), and the Cimbri at Vercellae (B.C. 101). Pompeius: it should be remembered that Pompey was now in the East, in the midst of his career of conquest, and that his return was looked for with expectancy by all parties. Cicero took every means to win the confidence of the great general, and gain him over to his views in public affairs; but to no purpose. After some wavering, Pompey associated himself with Caesar, thus giving the Senate a blow from which it never recovered, and preparing the way for his own downfall. aliquid loci:
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, FORTUNA HUIUSCE DIEI, AEDES (search)
FORTUNA HUIUSCE DIEI, AEDES a temple vowed by Q. Lutatius Catulus on the day of the battle of Vercellae, 30th June, 101 B.C. (Plut. Mar. 26:*tu/xh th=s h(me/ras e)kei/nhs), and dedicated by him on an anniversary of the battle (Fast. Allif. Pine. ad iii Kal. Aug., CIL i². p. 217, 219, 323). It was in the campus Martius (Fast. locc. citt.: in campo), but the exact site is unknown. This Fortuna is clearly the deity to whom the happy issue of each day is owing (Cic. de leg. ii. 28: Fortunaque sit vel Huiusce diei, nam valet in omnis dies, etc). Certain statues by Pythagoras of Samos stood ad aedem huiusce diei in Pliny's time (NH xxxiv. 60), but whether this temple is meant or that on the Palatine is uncertain (see below). In the sixth century (Procop. BG i. 15. I ) there was a stone replica of the Palladium which Diomede had brought from Troy to Italy e)n tw=| th=s *tuxhs i(erw=|, and it is generally assumed that this temple is referred to, although without much reason (HJ 491 ; Rosc
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PORTICUS CATULI (search)
PORTICUS CATULI built by Q. Lutatius Catulus next to his house on the Palatine, after his victory over the Cimbri in 101 B.C. Clodius enlarged the area of this porticus during Cicero's exile, He actually substituted his own name. For the situation of the porticus. see CICERO, M. TULLIUS, DOMUS. but it was afterwards restored to its original dimensions by decree of the senate (Cic. de domo 62, 102, 114, 116, 137; de Har. resp. 58; adAtt. iv. 2. 5; 3. 2; Val. Max. vi. 3. ; HJ 57, 58.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
Ceiling of Capitoline Temple gilded, 298. 138Temple of Mars in Circus Flaminius, 328. 125Aqua Tepula built, 27. 123Vestal dedicates shrine of Bona Dea Subsaxana, 85. 121Temple of Concord restored, 138. Basilica Opimia built, 81, 232. Fornix Fabianus, 211. 117Temple of Castor restored, 103. 115of Fides restored, 209. of Mens restored, 339. 114of Venus Verticordia, 554. 111of Magna Mater burnt and rebuilt, 324, 377. 110Porticus Minucia paved, 424. 102Porticus Catuli built, 421. 101Temple of Fortuna huiusce diei vowed, 216. 100(ca.). Horrea Galbae, 261. (ca.). Arch at mouth of Cloaca Maxima, 127. (ca.). Upper room of Carcer, ioo. Marius: Trophies of victory in Area Capitolina, 49, 541; builds Temple of Honos and Virtus Mariana, 259. 93Part of the Capitoline hill sold, 97. 91Temple of Pietas struck by lightning, 389. 90Juno Sospita restored, 291. (ca.). Two temples in Forum Holitorium, 277, 278. 87(ca.). Gateway in Palazzo Antonelli (?), 355. 83Capitoline T
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
ria to attack the cities of Ptolemais (Acre), Dora, and Gaza, which, with several others, had made themselves independent. The people of Ptolemais applied for aid to Ptolemy Lathyrus, then king of Cyprus, who came with an army of thirty thousand men. Alexander was defeated on the banks of the Jordan, and Ptolemy ravaged the country in the most barbarous manner. In B. C. 102, Cleopatra came to the assistance of Alexander with a fleet and army, and Ptolemy was compelled to return to Cyprus. (B. C. 101.) Soon afterwards Alexander invaded Coele Syria, and renewed his attacks upon the independent cities. In B. C. 96 he took Gaza, destroyed the city, and massacred all the inhabitants. The result of these undertakings, and his having attached himself to the party of the Sadducees, drew upon him the hatred of the Pharisees, who were by far the more numerous party. He was attacked by the people in B. C. 94, while officiating as high-priest at the feast of Tabernacles; but the insurrection was
Aqui'llius 2. M'. AQUILLIUS M'. F. M'. N., probably a son of the preceding, consul in B. C. 101, conducted the war against the slaves in Sicily, who had a second time revolted under Athenion. Aquillius completely subdued the insurgents, and triumphed on his return to Rome in 100. (Florus, 3.19; Liv. Epit, 69; Diod. xxxvi. Ecl. 1; Cic. in Verr. 3.54, 5.2; Fast. Capitol.) In 98, he was accused by L. Fufius of maladministration in Sicily; he was defended by the orator M. Antonius, and, though there were strong proofs of his guilt, was acquitted on account of his bravery in the war. (Cic. Brut. 52, de Off. 2.14, pro Flacc. 39, de Orat. 2.28, 47.) In B. C. 88, he went into Asia as one of the consular legates to prosecute the war against Mithridates and his allies. He was defeated near Protostachium, and was afterwards delivered up to Mithridates by the inhabitants of Mytilene. Mithridates treated him in the most barbarous manner, and eventually put him to death by pouring molten gold down
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