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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 13 13 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition.. You can also browse the collection for 101 BC or search for 101 BC in all documents.

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J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., chapter 17 (search)
opto, pray. Observe the adroit union of compliment and threat in this passage, which at the same time forms the transition to the appeal to the praetor presiding. Appeal to Glabrio, the presiding praetor, to prevent bribery. is: referring to the Senate. judicio: abl. of means. qui sis, what sort of man you are. reddere,pay back. fac . . . veniat: § 565 (33I, f, R.); cf. B. 295, 8; G. 553, I (end); H. 565, 4 (499, 2); H.-B. 502, 3, footnote 2 legis Aciliae:this (probably B.C. 101) provided that there should be neither ampliatio (further hearing) nor comperendinatio (see note on sect. 34, p. 40, l. 18) in cases of repetundae. All earlier laws were superseded by the Cornelian law of Sulla. Summae auctoritates, strongest influences, especially family traditions, etc. To the Roman mind an auctor, in this sense, was a pattern for imitation. quae . . . non sinant: best regarded as a purpose clause; cf. § 531. 2, N. (317, N.). ut ne quis, etc.: § 537,a, N. (319, a, N.);
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., Chapter 2 (search)
Appeal to Glabrio, the presiding praetor, to prevent bribery. is: referring to the Senate. judicio: abl. of means. qui sis, what sort of man you are. reddere,pay back. fac . . . veniat: § 565 (33I, f, R.); cf. B. 295, 8; G. 553, I (end); H. 565, 4 (499, 2); H.-B. 502, 3, footnote 2 legis Aciliae:this (probably B.C. 101) provided that there should be neither ampliatio (further hearing) nor comperendinatio (see note on sect. 34, p. 40, l. 18) in cases of repetundae. All earlier laws were superseded by the Cornelian law of Sulla. Summae auctoritates, strongest influences, especially family traditions, etc. To the Roman mind an auctor, in this sense, was a pattern for imitation. quae . . . non sinant: best regarded as a purpose clause; cf. § 531. 2, N. (317, N.). ut ne quis, etc.: § 537,a, N. (319, a, N.); G. 545,R.1; H.(499,1); cf. H.-B. 502, 3, a, footnote 2. nocenti reo,etc., for the accused, if guilty, his great wealth has had more weight to increase (lit. towards)
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., chapter 10 (search)
r of the younger Africanus, and, like his son, the most eminent and upright man of his generation. He brought the Third Macedonian War to a close by the battle of Pydna, B.C. 168, and led King Perseus captive in his triumphal procession. currum [triumphalem]: the captives did not go with or behind the triumphal chariot, but preceded it in the procession. bis liberavit: by the victories over the German invaders, —over the Teutones at Aquae Sextiae (B.C. 102), and the Cimbri at Vercellae (B.C. 101). Pompeius: it should be remembered that Pompey was now in the East, in the midst of his career of conquest, and that his return was looked for with expectancy by all parties. Cicero took every means to win the confidence of the great general, and gain him over to his views in public affairs; but to no purpose. After some wavering, Pompey associated himself with Caesar, thus giving the Senate a blow from which it never recovered, and preparing the way for his own downfall. aliquid loci: