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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 21 21 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 105 BC or search for 105 BC in all documents.

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o the Epicurean sect. He was well acquainted with Greek literature, or rather, says Cicero, was almost a Greek. (Brut. 35.) On account of his affecting on every occasion the Greek language and philosophy, he was satirized by Lucilius, whose lines upon him are preserved by Cicero (de Fin. 1.3); and Cicero himself speaks of him as a light-minded man. He accused, but unsuccessfully, Q. Mucius Scaevola, the augur, of maladministration (repetundae) in his province. (Brut. 26, De Orat. 2.70.) In B. C. 105 Albucius was praeter in Sardinia, and in consequence of some insignificant success which he had gained over some robbers, he celebrated a triumph in the province. On his return to Rome, he applied to the senate for the honour of a supplicatio, but this was refused, and he was accused in B. C. 103 of repetundae by C. Julius Caesar, and condemned. Cn. Pompeius Strabo had offered himself as the accuser, but he was not allowed to conduct the prosecution, because he had been the quaestor of Alb
m to enrich himself by the plunder both of the city and the temple. The wealth which he thus acquired was enormous; but he was thought to have paid for it dearly, as the subsequent destruction of his army and his own unhappy fate were regarded as a divine punishment for his sacrilegious act. Hence too arose the proverb, "Aurum Tolosanum habet." (Strab. iv. p.188; Dio Cass. Frag. xcvii. p. 41; Gel. 3.9; Just. 32.3 ; Oros. 5.15.) He was continued in his command in Gaul in the following year (B. C. 105), in which some writers place the sack of Tolosa; and, that there might be a still stronger force to oppose the Cimbri, the consul Cn. Mallius, or Manlius, was sent with another consular army into Gallia Narbonensis. As however Caepio and Mallius could not agree, they divided the province between them, one having the country west, and the other the country east, of the Rhone. Soon afterwards, M. Aurelius Scaurus was defeated by the Cimbri, and Mallius sent for Caepio, that they might unite
Ca'tulus 3. Q. Lutatius Catulus, Q. F., consul B. C. 102 with C. Marius IV., having been previously defeated in three successive attempts, first by C. Atilius Serranus, who was consul in 106, secondly by Cn. Manlius (or Mallius, or Manilius), who was consul in B. C. 105, and thirdly by C. Flavius Fimbria, who was consul in B. C. 104. He either was not a candidate for the consulship of 103, or if unsuccessful, his disappointment is not alluded to by Cicero in the passage where the rest of his repulses are enumerated. (Pro Planc. 5.) At the time when Catulus entered upon office, the utmost consternation reigned at Rome. The Cimbri, who in their great migration westward had been joined by the Teutoni, the Ambrones, the Tigurini, and various other tribes, after sweeping the upper valley of the Danube and spreading over Southern Gaul and Northern Spain, after defeating four Roman consuls, Carbo (113), Silanus (109), Cassius (107), Manlius (105), together with the proconsul Caepio (105),
ivated speaker (Brut. 28); M.' Manilius, consul B. C. 149, under whom Scipio served as military tribune at the outbreak of the third Punic war, probably the same person as Manilius the famous jurisconsult; Sp. Mummius, the brother of him who sacked Corinth, a man of moderate acquirements, addicted to the discipline of the Porch; Q. Aelius Tubero, son of Aemilia, sister of Africanus, a prominent opponent of the Gracchi, well skilled in law and logic, but no orator; P. Rutilius Rufus, consul B. C. 105, the most worthy citizen, according to Velleius, not merely of his own day, but of all time, who having been condemned in a criminal trial (B. C. 92), although innocent, by a conspiracy among the equites, retired to Smyrna, where he passed the remainder of his life in honourable exile; Q. Mucius Scaevola, the augur, consul B. C. 117, the first preceptor of Cicero in jurisprudence; and lastly, C. Fannius, the historian, who was absent, however, on the second day of the conference, as we lea
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Crassus, Clau'dius 17. M. LICINIUS CRASSUS DIVES, P. F. M. N., the younger son of No. 14. The date of his birth is not precisely recorded, but it is probable that he was born about the year B. C. 105, for Plutarch states, that he was younger than Pompey (Plut. Crass. 6), and that he was more than sixty years old when he departed (in the year B. C. 55) to make war against the Parthians. (Ib. 17.) In the year B. C. 87, when his father and brother suffered death for their resistance to Marius and Cinna, he was not considered of sufficient importance to be involved in the same doom; but he was closely watched, and after some time he thought it prudent to make his escape to Spain, which he had visited some years before, when his father had the command in that country. How he concealed himself in a cavern near the sea upon the estate of Vibius Paciaecus, and how he passed his life in this strange retreat, is related in detail by the lively and amusing pen of Plutarch. After a retirement
Fi'mbria *fimbri/as. 1. C. Flavius Fimbria, a homo novus, who, according to Cicero, rose to the highest honours in the republic through his own merit and talent. In B. C. 105 he was a candidate for the consulship, and the people gave him the preference to his competitor, Q. Lutatius Catulus; and accordingly, Fimbria was the colleague of C. Marius in his second consulship, B. C. 104. Fimbria must have acquired his popularity about that time, for we learn from Cicero (pro Planc. 21), that previously he had been an unsuccessful candidate for the tribuneship. What province he obtained after his consulship is unknown, but he seems to have been guilty of extortion during his administration, for M. Gratidius brought an action of repetundae against him, and was supported by the evidence of M. Aemilius Scaurus; but Fimbria was nevertheless acquitted. During the revolt of Saturninus, in B. C. 100, Fimbria, with other consulars, took up arms to defend the public good. Cicero describes him as a
Fufi'dius 1. L. Fufidius, a pleader of causes in some repute at Rome, about B. C. 115-105. M. Aemilius Scaurus the elder addressed to him an autobiography in three books. (Cic. Brut. 30; Plin. Nat. 23.1. s. 6.)
ndent monarch. His life is given under HYRCANUS. He was succeeded by his son, Aristoboulus I. 5. was the first of the Maccabees who assumed the kingly title, which was henceforth borne by his successors. His reign lasted only a year (B. C. 106-105). [ARISTOBULUS, No. 1.] He was succeeded by his brother, Alexander Jannaeus 6. reigned B. C. 105-78. [ALEXANDER JANNAEUS, Vol. I. p. 117.] He was succeeded by his widow, Alexandra 7. appointed her son Hyrcanus II. to the priesthood, and helB. C. 105-78. [ALEXANDER JANNAEUS, Vol. I. p. 117.] He was succeeded by his widow, Alexandra 7. appointed her son Hyrcanus II. to the priesthood, and held the supreme power B. C. 78-69. On her death in the latter year her son, Hyrcanus II. 8. obtained the kingdom, B. C. 69, but was supplanted almost immediately afterwards by his brother, Aristobulus II. 9. who obtained the throne B. C. 68. [ARISTOBULUS, No. 2.] For the remainder of the history of the house of the Maccabees see HYRCANUS II. and HERODES I.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Aristoboulus I. 5. was the first of the Maccabees who assumed the kingly title, which was henceforth borne by his successors. His reign lasted only a year (B. C. 106-105). [ARISTOBULUS, No. 1.] He was succeeded by his brother,
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Alexander Jannaeus 6. reigned B. C. 105-78. [ALEXANDER JANNAEUS, Vol. I. p. 117.] He was succeeded by his widow,
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