hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 7 7 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 124 BC or search for 124 BC in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, FREGELLAE (search)
FREGELLAE a quarter in Rome inhabited by Fregellans (Fest. 91), perhaps the survivors of the destruction of Fregellae in 124 B.C.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, GRAECOSTASIS (search)
the other hand, we are told that in 304 B.C. Cn. Flavius erected a small bronze shrine (aedicula) to CONCORDIA (q.v.) on the Graecostasis quae tunc supra Comitium erat (Plin. NH xxxiii. 19), and this 'aedes ' is also spoken of as 'in area Volcani ' (Liv. ix. 46)-a statement that may mean that the Graecostasis had been moved or had ceased to exist at all in Pliny's day. About 30 B.C. sacrifices were offered to Luna 'in Graecostasi' (Fast. Pinc., CIL i². p. 219), and for the years 137, 130, 124 B.C., it is recorded that it rained blood or milk on the Graecostasis (Obseq. de prod. 24, 28, 31). The Graecostasis was therefore an open platform between the comitium and the forum, on the site afterwards occupied by the arch of Severus, and eastwards. Cf. JRS 1922, II, 25, where Van Deman places it under and north of the rostra of Augustus. Hiilsen (HC. pl. v.) places it conjecturally to the west of the Lapis Niger (TF 64), but the pavement here is probably the pavement of the Sullan rostra v