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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 16 16 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White) 2 2 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 125 BC or search for 125 BC in all documents.

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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, AQUA TEPULA (search)
AQUA TEPULA * an aqueduct constructed in 125 B.C. (Plin. NH xxxvi. 121 wrongly says that it was repaired by Q. Marcius Rex; Frontinus, de aquis i. 4, 8, 9, 18, 19; ii. 67-69, 82, 125; Not. app.; Pol. Silv. 545, 546). Its springs were two miles to the right of the tenth mile of the via Latina, where a tepid spring, the Acqua Preziosa, still exists (PBS v. 222); but no remains of its original channel have ever been found. In 33 B.C. Agrippa mixed its water with that of the aqua Iulia; and from that time onwards its channel entered the city on the arches of the AQUA MARCIA (q.v.). In Frontinus' time its intake was considered as beginning from the reservoir of the aqua Iulia, where it received 190 quinariae, then 92 from the Marcia, and 163 from the Anio Novus at the horti Epaphroditiani, making 445 quinariae in all, or 18,467 cubic metres in 24 hours. See LA 293-314; LR 52, 53.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PALATINUS MONS (search)
f the private houses, which, as the Palatine changed its character and began to come into favour, owing to its position, as a place of residence for the aristocracy, sprang up all over the hill. The oldest of which we have any record is that of VITRUVIUS VACCUS (q.v.) in 330 B.C. Later we hear of that of Cn. Octavius, consul in 165 B.C., which was bought by M. SCAURUS for the enlargement of his own house (q.v.); and not far off was that of Crassus. The house of M. Fulvius Flaccus, consul in 125 B.C., on the site of which Q. Lutatius Catulus built a portico, and a house for himself close to it, must have lain near the north end of the hill; as also must that of M. Livius Drusus, as well as that of Cicero. Other important republican houses, such as those of Q. Cicero, Milo, P. Sulla and Licinius Calvus, were also situated in this part of the Palatine; but the site of that of Mark Antony cannot be fixed. Nor is it possible to identify with certainty any of the houses mentioned above with
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
or and Juno Regina, 304. 145Temple of Hercules Victor vowed, 256. Assembly moved to Forum, 135, 232. 144-140Q. Marcius Rex repairs Anio Vetus, 13 Aqua Appia, 21 and builds Aqua Marcia, 24. 142Temple of Hercules Victor dedicated, 256. Wooden arches of Pons Aemilius built, 397: and Janiculum fortified, 275. Ceiling of Capitoline Temple gilded, 298. 138Temple of Mars in Circus Flaminius, 328. 125Aqua Tepula built, 27. 123Vestal dedicates shrine of Bona Dea Subsaxana, 85. 121Temple of Concord restored, 138. Basilica Opimia built, 81, 232. Fornix Fabianus, 211. 117Temple of Castor restored, 103. 115of Fides restored, 209. of Mens restored, 339. 114of Venus Verticordia, 554. 111of Magna Mater burnt and rebuilt, 324, 377. 110Porticus Minucia paved, 424. 102Porticus Catuli built, 421. 101Temple of Fortuna huiusce diei vowed, 216. 100(ca.). Horrea Galbae, 261. (ca.). Arch a