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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 17 17 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 130 BC or search for 130 BC in all documents.

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, 4, 26.6, 31.12, 13; Appian, App. Syr. 5, 32, 42; Diod. l.c.) Ariara'thes V. Son of the preceding, previously called Mithridates, reigned 33 years, B. C. 163-130. He was surnamed Philopator, and was distinguished by the excellence of his character and his cultivation of philosophy and the liberal arts. According to Livy (42.erwards named as sole king. In B. C. 154, Ariarathes assisted Attalus in his war against Prusias, and sent his son Demetrius in command of his forces. He fell in B. C. 130, in the war of the Romans against Aristonicus of Pergamus. In return for the succours which he had brought the Romans on that occasion, Lycaonia and Cilicia were.c., Exc. xxiv. p. 626, ed. Wess.; Plb. 3.5, 32.20, 23, 33.12; Justin, 35.1, 37.1.) Ariara'thes Vi. The youngest son of the preceding, reigned about 34 years, B. C. 130-96. He was a child at his succession. He married Laodice, the sister of Mithridates Eupator, king of Pontus, and was put to death by Mithridates by means of Gord
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Ariara'thes V. Son of the preceding, previously called Mithridates, reigned 33 years, B. C. 163-130. He was surnamed Philopator, and was distinguished by the excellence of his character and his cultivation of philosophy and the liberal arts. According to Livy (42.19), he was educated at Rome; but this account may perhaps refer to the other Ariarathes, one of the supposititious sons of the late king. In consequence of rejecting, at the wish of the Romans, a marriage with the sister of Demetriushe joint government, however, did not last long; for we find Ariarathes shortly afterwards named as sole king. In B. C. 154, Ariarathes assisted Attalus in his war against Prusias, and sent his son Demetrius in command of his forces. He fell in B. C. 130, in the war of the Romans against Aristonicus of Pergamus. In return for the succours which he had brought the Romans on that occasion, Lycaonia and Cilicia were added to the dominions of his family. By his wife Laodice he had six children ; bu
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Ariara'thes Vi. The youngest son of the preceding, reigned about 34 years, B. C. 130-96. He was a child at his succession. He married Laodice, the sister of Mithridates Eupator, king of Pontus, and was put to death by Mithridates by means of Gordius. (Justin, 37.1, 38.1; Memnon, apud Phot. Cod. 224, p. 230a. 41, ed. Bekker.) On his death the kingdom was seized by Nicomedes, king of Bithynia, who married Laodice, the widow of the late king. But Nicomedes was coon expelled by Mithridates, who placed upon the throne,
towns, for fear of the Romans, refused to recognise him, but he compelled them by force of arms; and at last there seemed no doubt of his ultimate success. In B. C. 131, the consul P. Licinius Crassus, who received Asia as his province, marched against him; but he was more intent upon making booty than on combating his enemy, and in an ill-organized battle which was fought about the end of the year, his army was defeated, and he himself made prisoner by Aristonicus. In the year following, B. C. 130, the consul M. Perperna, who succeeded Crassus, acted with more energy, and in the very first engagement conquered Aristonicus and took him prisoner. After the death of Perperna, M. Aquillius completed the conquest of the kingdom of Pergamus, B. C. 129. Aristcnuicus was carried to Rome to adorn the triumph of Aquillius, and was then beheaded. (Justin, 36.4; Liv. Epit. 59; Vell. 2.4; Flor. 2.20; Oros. 5.10; Sail. Hist. 4; Appian, App. Mith. 12, 62, de Bell. Civ. 1.17; V. Max. 3.4.5; Diod.
Clau'dius 26. C. Claudius Pulcher, son of No. 22, was consul in B. C. 130, and laid information before the senate of the disturbances excited by C. Papirius Carbo. (Cic. de Leg. 3.19.)
Eudoxus 3. Of Cyzicus, a geographer, who went from his native place to Egypt, and was employed by Ptolemy Evergetes and his wife Cleopatra in voyages to India; but afterwards, being robbed of all his property by Ptolemy Lathyrus, he sailed away down the Red Sea, and at last arrived at Gades. He afterwards made attempts to circumnavigate Africa in the opposite direction, but without success. (Strab. ii. pp. 98-100; Plin. Nat. 2.67.) He must have lived about B. C. 130. [P.S]
arance received the appellation of the Wise or the Prudent (Plut. TG 8). Laelius indeed had neither the steady principles of Tiberius, nor the fervid genius of C. Gracchus. He could discern, but he could not apply the remedy for social evils. And after the tribunate of the elder Gracchus, B. C. 133, his sentiments underwent a change. He assisted the consuls of B. C. 132 in examining C. Blossius of Cumae and the other partizans of Tib. Gracchus (Cic. de Amic. 11 ; comp. Plut. TG 20), and in B. C. 130, he spoke against the Papirian Rogation, which would have enabled the tribunes of the plebs to be re-elected from year to year (Cic. de Amic. 25; Liv. Epit. 59). But although Laelius was the strenuous opponent of the popular leaders of his age--the tribunes C. Licinius Crassus, B. C. 145, C. Papirius Carbo, B. C. 131, and C. Gracchus B. C. 123-122 --nature had denied him the qualities of a great orator. His speeches read better than those of his contemporary and rival C. Servius Galba, yet
B. C. 170 [ACCIUS]. This agrees with the statement of Jerome (in Euseb. Chron. Olymp. 156. 3) that Pacuvius flourished about B. C. 154, since we know from various sources that Pacuvius attained a great age, and accordingly the time understood by the indefinite term flourished may properly be placed in B. C. 154, though Pacuvius was then about sixty-five years old. Jerome further relates that Pacuvius was almost ninety years of age at the time of his death, which would therefore fall about B. C. 130. Pacuvius was a native of Brundisium, and accordingly a countryman of Ennius, with whom he was connected by ties of blood, and whom he is also said to have buried. According to the accounts of most ancient writers he was the son of the sister of Ennius, and this is more probable than the statement of Jerome, that he was the grandson of Ennius by his daughter, since Ennius was only nineteen years older than Pacuvius. Pacuvius appears to have been brought up at Brundisium, But he. afterwards
Perperna or PERPENNA *perpe/nnas, the name of a Roman gens. We may infer from the termination of the word, that the Perpernae were of Etruscan origin, like the CAECINAE and SPURINNAE. The Perpernae are first mentioned in the latter half of the second century B. C., and the first member of the gens, who obtained the consulship, was M. Perperna in B. C. 130. There is considerable doubt as to the orthography of the name, since both Perperna and Perpenna occur in the best manuscripts ; but as we find Perperna in the Fasti Capitolini, this appears to be the preferable form. (Comp. Graevius and Garaton. ad Cie. pro Rosc. Com. 1; Duker, ad Flor. 2.20; Drakenborch, ad Liv. 44.27.) There are no coins now extant to determine the question of the orthography, although in the time of Fronto there were coins bearing this name. (Fronto, p. 249, ed. Rom.)
Perperna 2. M. Perperna, consul in B. C. 130, is said to have been a consul before he was a citizen; for Valerius Maximus relates (3.3.5), that the father of this Perperna was condemned under the Papia lex after the death of his son, because he had falsely usurped the rights of a Roman citizen. * As to this Papia lex, the date of which has given rise to some dispute, see PAPIUS. M. Perperna was praetor in B. C. 135, in which year he had the conduct of the war against the slaves in Sicily, and in consequence of the advantages which he obtained over them received the honour of an ovation on his return to Rome. (Flor. 3.19; Fasti Capit.) He was consul in B. C. 130 with C. Claudius Pulcher Lentulus, and was sent into Asia against Aristonicus, who had defeated one of the consuls of the previous year, P. Licinius Crassus. Perperna, however, soon brought the war to a close. He defeated Aristonicus in the first engagement, and followed up his victory by laying siege to Stratoniceia, whith
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