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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 16 16 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
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Appian, Wars in Spain (ed. Horace White), CHAPTER XII (search)
the greater part of it to retreat through a hidden defile, while he drew up the remainder on a hill as though he intended to fight. When he judged that those who had been sent before had reached a place of safety, he darted after them with such disregard of the enemy and such swiftness that his pursuers did not know whither he had gone. Cæpio turned against the Vettones and the Callaici and wasted their fields. Y.R. 616 Emulating the example of Viriathus many other guerilla B.C. 138 bands made incursions into Lusitania and ravaged it. Sextus Junius Brutus, who was sent against them, despaired of following them through the extensive country bounded by the navigable rivers Tagus, Lethe, Durius, and Bætis, because he considered it extremely difficult to overtake them while flying from place to place after the manner of robbers, and yet disgraceful not to do so, and a task not very glorious even if he should conquer them. He therefore turned against their towns, thinking tha
Polybius, Histories, book 33, Alexander Balas (search)
Alexander Balas Many different embassies having come to Rome, B.C. 152. Visit of the young Attalus, son of the late king Eumenes. the Senate admitted Attalus,Surnamed Philometor. He succeeded his uncle Attalus Philadelphus in B.C. 138, and at his death in B.C. 133 left his dominions to Rome. son of king Eumenes I. For he had arrived at Rome at this time, still quite a young boy, to be introduced to the Senate, and to renew in his person the ancestral friendship and connexion with the Romans. Demetrius, son of Ariarathes VI.After a kindly reception by the Senate and his father's friends, and after receiving the answer which he desired, and such honours as suited his time of life, he returned to his native land, meeting with a warm and liberal reception in all the Greek cities through which he passed on his return journey. Demetrius also came at this time, and, after receiving a fairly good reception for a boy, returned home. Then Heracleides entered the Senate, bringing Laodice andLao
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero, Allen and Greenough's Edition., section 27 (search)
Brutus: D. Junius Brutus (cos. B.C. 138) conquered the Lusitanians (of Portugal). Acci: L. Accius (less properly Attius), a tragic poet (born B.C. 170); distinguished for vigor and sublimity; he lived long enough for Cicero in his youth to converse with him. Fulvius: M. Fulvius Nobilior (cos. B.C. 189) subdued Aetolia. He was distinguished as a friend of Greek literature, and built, from the spoils of war, a temple to Hercules and the Muses. prope armati, having scarce laid aside their arms. togati: see note on p. 125, l. 17.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, MARS, AEDES (search)
MARS, AEDES (templum, Plin., Bob., Val. Max.): a temple in circo Flaminio, built for D. Junius Brutus Callaicus in 138 B.C. by the architect Hermodorus of Salamis (Nepos ap. Priscian. viii. 17). In the vestibule were inscribed some lines of the poet Accius in Saturnian metre (Schol. Bob. in Cic. pro Archia 27; Val. Max. viii. 14. 2). The temple contained a colossal statue of Mars by Scopas, and a Venus by the same artist that was said to excel that of Praxiteles (Plin. NH xxxvi. 26). Its exact site is unknown, but it has been located by some south of the theatre of Pompeius (AR 1909, 77), by others identified in a fragment of the Marble Plan (FUR IIO), which represents remains that exist under S. Nicola ai Cesarini (BC 1911, 261-264; 1914, 385).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
dedicated, 207. Temples of Juppiter Stator and Juno Regina, 304. 145Temple of Hercules Victor vowed, 256. Assembly moved to Forum, 135, 232. 144-140Q. Marcius Rex repairs Anio Vetus, 13 Aqua Appia, 21 and builds Aqua Marcia, 24. 142Temple of Hercules Victor dedicated, 256. Wooden arches of Pons Aemilius built, 397: and Janiculum fortified, 275. Ceiling of Capitoline Temple gilded, 298. 138Temple of Mars in Circus Flaminius, 328. 125Aqua Tepula built, 27. 123Vestal dedicates shrine of Bona Dea Subsaxana, 85. 121Temple of Concord restored, 138. Basilica Opimia built, 81, 232. Fornix Fabianus, 211. 117Temple of Castor restored, 103. 115of Fides restored, 209. of Mens restored, 339. 114of Venus Verticordia, 554. 111of Magna Mater burnt and rebuilt, 324, 377. 110Porticus Minucia paved, 424. 102Porticus Catuli built, 421. 101Temple of Fortuna huiusce diei vowed, 216. 100
Apollodo'rus 17. A Greek GRAMMARIAN of Athens, was a son of Asclepiades, and a pupil of the grammarian Aristarchus, of Panaetius, and Diogenes the Babylonian. He flourished about the year B. C. 140, a few years after the fall of Corinth. Further particulars are not mentioned about him. We know that one of his historical works (the xronika/) came down to the year B. C. 143, and that it was dedicated to Attalus II., surnamed Philadelphus, who died in B. C. 138; but how long Apollodorus lived after the year B. C. 143 is unknown. Works Apollodorus wrote a great number of works, and on a variety of subjects, which were much used in antiquity, but all of them have perished with the exception of one, and even this one has not come down to us complete. *Biblioqh/khThis work is not now thought to be by Apollodorus and we label the author Pseudo-Apollodorus -- GRC 5/16/2008. This work bears the title *Biblioqh/kh; it consists of three books, and is by far the best among the extant works
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or Mithridates I. (search)
aeans, who had revolted from the Syrians, and his empire extended at least from the Hindu Caucasus to the Euphrates. Demetrius Nicator, king of Syria, marched against Mithridates; he was at first suecessful, but was afterwards taken prisoner in B. C. 138. Mithridates, however, treated him with respect, and gave him his daughter Rhodogune in marriage; but the marriage appears not to have been solemnized till the accession of his son Phraates II. Mithridates died during the captivity of Demetrius, between B. C. 138 and 130. He is described as a just and upright prince, who did not give way to pride and luxury. He introduced among his people the best laws and usages, which he found among the nations he had conquered. (Justin, 41.6; Oros. 5.4; Strab. xi. pp. 516, 517, 524, &c.: Appian, App. Syr. 67; Justin, 36.1, 38.9; J. AJ 13.9; 1 Maccab. c. ]4; Diod. Exc. p. 597, ed. Wess.) The reverse of the annexed coin has the inscription *B*A*S*I*L*E*W*S *M*E*G*A*L*O*U *A*R*S*A*K*O*U *F*I*L*E*L*L
delphia in Lydia (Steph. Byz. s.v.) and Attaleia in Pamphylia. (Strab. xiv. p.667.) He encouraged the arts and sciences, and was himself the inventor of a kind of embroidery. (Plin. Nat. 7.39, 35.36.19, 8.74; Athen. 8.346, xiv. p. 634.) He died B. C. 138, aged eighty-two. Attalus Iii. Surnamed PHILOMETOR, was the son of Eumenes II. and Stratonice, daughter of Ariarathes, king of Cappadocia. While yet a boy, he was brought to Rome (B. C. 152), and presented to the senate at the same time with Alexander Balas. He succeeded his uncle Attalus II. B. C. 138. He is known to us chiefly for the extravagance of his conduct and the murder of his relations and friends. At last, seized with remorse, he abandoned all public business, and devoted himself to sculpture, statuary, and gardening, on which he wrote a work. He died B. C. 133 of a fever, with which he was seized in consequence of exposing himself to the sun's rays while engaged in erecting a monument to his mother. In his will, he mad
, 32.25, &c., 33.1, 6, 10, 11; Appian, App. Mith. 3, &c.; Diod. xxxi. Exc. p. 589.) In 152, he sent some troops to aid Alexander Balas in usurping the throne of Syria (Porphyr. apud Euseb. p. 187; Just. 35.1), and in 149 he assisted Nicomedes against his father Prusias. He was also engaged in hostilities with, and conquered, Diegylis, a Thracian prince, the father-in-law of Prusias (Diod. xxxiii. Exc. p. 595, &c.; Strab. xiii. p.624), and sent some auxiliary troops to the Romans, which assisted them in expelling the pseudo-Philip and in taking Corinth. (Strab. l.c.; Paus. 7.16.8.) During the latter part of his life, he resigned himself to the guidance of his minister, Philopoemen. (Plut. Mor. p. 792.) He founded Philadelphia in Lydia (Steph. Byz. s.v.) and Attaleia in Pamphylia. (Strab. xiv. p.667.) He encouraged the arts and sciences, and was himself the inventor of a kind of embroidery. (Plin. Nat. 7.39, 35.36.19, 8.74; Athen. 8.346, xiv. p. 634.) He died B. C. 138, aged eighty-two.
Attalus Iii. Surnamed PHILOMETOR, was the son of Eumenes II. and Stratonice, daughter of Ariarathes, king of Cappadocia. While yet a boy, he was brought to Rome (B. C. 152), and presented to the senate at the same time with Alexander Balas. He succeeded his uncle Attalus II. B. C. 138. He is known to us chiefly for the extravagance of his conduct and the murder of his relations and friends. At last, seized with remorse, he abandoned all public business, and devoted himself to sculpture, statuary, and gardening, on which he wrote a work. He died B. C. 133 of a fever, with which he was seized in consequence of exposing himself to the sun's rays while engaged in erecting a monument to his mother. In his will, he made the Romans his heirs. (Strab. xiii. p.624; Plb. 33.16; Just. 36.14; Diod. xxxiv. Exc. p. 601; Varro, R. R. Praef.; Columell. 1.1.8; Plin. Nat. 18.5; Liv. Epit. 58; Plut. TG 14; Vell. 2.4; Florus, 2.20; Appian. Mithr. 62, Bell. Civ. 5.4.) His kingdom was claimed by Aristonic
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