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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 27 27 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 142 BC or search for 142 BC in all documents.

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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, IANICULUM (search)
ettlement was Antipolis (v. PAGUS IANICULENSIS). Ancus Martius was said to have fortified the Janiculum in order that it might not be occupied by a hostile force (Liv. i. 33 ; Dionys. iii. 45), and during the republic a guard was always posted on the hill while the comitia centuriata was meeting in the campus Martius (Liv. xxxix. 1 5; Cass. Dio xxxvii. 28); but there is no evidence of any fortification until the completion of the first permanent bridge over the Tiber, the pons Aemilius, in 142 B.C. Whatever was built then was probably at the top of the ridge, near the porta Aurelia in the line of the later wall of Aurelian, which was brought up to this point from the river for this very reason (Richter, 51, 120). It was the first point of attack for Marius and Cinna in the Civil Wars (Liv. Ep. 80; Appian, BC i. 67; Flor. iii. 21, 23). For a discussion of the derivation and meaning of Janiculum and of the hill and its fortifications, see Richter, Die Befestigung des Ianiculums, Berlin
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PONS AEMILIUS (search)
of the citations just made with other passages (Ov. Fast. vi. 477-478; Serv. Aen. viii. 646; Aethicus, Cosmog. 28 (ed. Riese 83) ) indicates that this bridge was close to the pons Sublicius and crossed the river from the forum Boarium (cf. CIL i². p. 325). According to Livy (xl. 51. 4) M. Fulvius Nobilior when censor in 179 B.C. contracted (undoubtedly with his colleague M. Aemilius Lepidus) for the placing of 'pilas pontis in Tiberi,' and P. Scipio Africanus and L. Minucius, the censors of 142 B.C., built arches (fornices) on these piers. This statement is now generally believed to refer to the pons Aemilius, and Plutarch's attribution of the building of the bridge to a quaestor, Aemilius, is interpreted as a mistake or on the hypothesis that the fornices of 142 were of wood and that the stone arches were laid by a later Aemilius in his quaestorship. That the upper part of the bridge was of wood, until 142 at least, is certain, and therefore a statement in Obsequens (16) under date
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
Basilica Aemilia, 72. 150(ca.). Columna rostrata of Duilius restored, 134. 148Regia burnt and restored, 441. 147Porticus Metelli, 424. 146(after). Temple of Felicitas dedicated, 207. Temples of Juppiter Stator and Juno Regina, 304. 145Temple of Hercules Victor vowed, 256. Assembly moved to Forum, 135, 232. 144-140Q. Marcius Rex repairs Anio Vetus, 13 Aqua Appia, 21 and builds Aqua Marcia, 24. 142Temple of Hercules Victor dedicated, 256. Wooden arches of Pons Aemilius built, 397: and Janiculum fortified, 275. Ceiling of Capitoline Temple gilded, 298. 138Temple of Mars in Circus Flaminius, 328. 125Aqua Tepula built, 27. 123Vestal dedicates shrine of Bona Dea Subsaxana, 85. 121Temple of Concord restored, 138. Basilica Opimia built, 81, 232. Fornix Fabianus, 211. 117Temple of Castor restored, 103. 115of Fides restored, 209. of Mens restored, 339. 114of Venus Verticordi