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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 9 9 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
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J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., Roman Oratory. (search)
es are lost, but more than a hundred and fifty of them were known to Cicero, who praises them as acutae, elegantes, facetae, breves. It was in Cato's lifetime that the introduction of Greek art and letters into Rome took place; and oratory, like all other forms of literature, felt the new influence at once. The oration, though still valued most for its effectiveness, soon came to be looked on as an artistic work as well. The beginning of this tendency is seen in Ser. Sulpicius Galba (cons. B.C. 144) and M. Lepidus (consul B.C. 137). Galba, in the words of Cicero, "was the first of the Latins to employ the peculiar arts of the orator,—digressions to introduce ornament, the art of captivating the minds of his hearers, of moving them with passion, of exaggerating a case, of appealing to pity, and the art of introducing coinmonplaces. That is, digressions on general subjects which would fit any particular oration when a point of the kind arose. It was in Lepidus, however, that the full e