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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 44 44 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 8 8 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 4 4 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 3 3 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 3 3 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 2 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 2 2 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.). You can also browse the collection for 146 BC or search for 146 BC in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.), BOOK VI., CHAPTER IV. (search)
exception of the districts on the Po. While these still remained a subject of dispute they passed over into Sicily,In the year 264 B. C. and having wrested that island from the CarthaginiansIn the year 241 B. C. they re- turned to complete the conquest of the people dwelling along the Po. While this war was still in hand Hannibal entered Italy,218 B. C. thus the second war against the Carthaginians ensued, and after a very short interval the third, in which Carthage was demolished.146 B. C. At the same time the Romans became masters of Africa,Libu\h. and of such portions of Spain as they won from the Carthaginians. Both the Greeks and the Macedonians, and the nations of Asia who dwelt on the hither side of the river Kisil-IrmakThe ancient Halys. and the Taurus, took part in these struggles with the Carthaginians: over these AntiochusAntiochus ceded Asia Minor in the year B. C. 189. was king, and Philip and Perseus,Perseus was taken in the year B. C. 167. these therefo
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.), BOOK VIII., CHAPTER VI. (search)
rrival in Peloponnesus, Tenea was assigned to them as a habitation by Agamemnon. The Corinthians, when subject to Philip, espoused his party very zealously, and individually conducted themselves so contemptuously towards the Romans, that persons ventured to throw down filth upon their ambassadors, when passing by their houses. They were immediately punished for these and other offences and insults. A large army was sent out under the commaud of Lucius Mummius, who razed the city.B. C. 146. The rest of the country, as far as Macedonia, was subjected to the Romans under different generals. The Sicyonii, however, had the largest part of the Corinthian territory. Polybius relates with regret what occurred at the capture of the city, and speaks of the indifference the soldiers showed for works of art, and the sacred offerings of the temples. He says, that he was present, and saw pictures thrown upon the ground, and soldiers playing at dice upon them. Among others, he specif
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.), BOOK X., CHAPTER V. (search)
ions of Coray. in his Details, intimates how poor they were; "O Latona, thou art shortly going to pass by me [an insignificant is- land] like to the iron-bound Pholegandrus, or to unhappy Gyarus. Although DelosIn the middle of the Cyclades, and by far the most remarkable, is Delos, celebrated for the temple of Apollo, and for its commerce. Pliny iv. 12. was so famous, yet it became still more so, and flourished after the destruction of Corinth by the Romans.Under L. Mummius, B. C. 146. For the merchants resorted thither, induced by the immunities of the temple, and the convenience of its harbour. It lies favourablyThucyd. i. 36. for those who are sailing from Italy and Greece to Asia. The general festival held there serves the purposes of commerce, and the Romans particularly frequented it even before the destruction of Corinth.Kai\ o(/te sunesth/kei h/ Ko/rnqos. The Athenians, after having taken the island, paid equal attention to the affairs both of religion and of
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.), BOOK XVI., CHAPTER IV. (search)
and Troglodytica which Diodorus Siculus (b. iii. 31) says he derived from Agatharchides, we find an identity, not only in almost all the details, but also in a great number of the expressions. It is, therefore, evident that Artemidorus, for this part of his work, scarcely did anything more than copy Agatharchides. Agatharchides, in his youth, held the situation of secretary or reader to Heraclides Lembus, who (according to Suidas) lived in the reign of Ptolemy Philometor. This king died B. C. 146. He wrote a work on Asia in 10 books, and one on Europe in 49 books; a geographical work on the Erythræan Sea in 5 books; a treatise on the Troglodyæ in 5 books; and other works. He wrote in the Attic dialect. His style, according to Photius, was dignified and perspicuous, and abounded in sententious passages, which inspired a favourable opinion of his judgment. In the composition of his speeches he was an imitator of Thucydides, whom he equalled in dignity, and excelled in clearness. His rhe