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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 28 28 Browse Search
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 18 18 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 5 5 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 4 4 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Oedipus at Colonus 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 150 BC or search for 150 BC in all documents.

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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, BASILICA AEMILIA BASILICA PAULI (search)
acted for the building of a basilica 'post argentarias novas' (Liv. xl. 51). In 159 P. Cornelius Scipio Nasica, when censor, installed a water clock in basilica Aemilia et Fulvia (Varro, LL vi. 4; cf. Censorin. de die nat. 23. 7; Plin. NH vii. 215: idque horologium sub tecto dicavit a.u. DXCV). This use of the double name, Aemilia et Fulvia, would seem to indicate that it was thus given in Varro's source, and was a usual, perhaps the official, designation of the building in the middle of the second century B.C., and that it had not wholly dropped out of use in Varro's own time. If so, Fulvius' colleague in the censorship of 179, M. Aemilius Lepidus, must have had at least equal responsibility in its construction, notwithstanding Livy's statement, a hypothesis that is supported by references to the later history of the basilica. In 78 B.C., the consul M. Aemilius Lepidus decorated the building (here called basilica Aemilia) with engraved shields or portraits of his ancestors (Plin. NHx
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, COLUMNA ROSTRATA C. DUILII (search)
COLUMNA ROSTRATA C. DUILII the second and more famous of these two columns mentioned above (Serv. loc. cit.; Plin. NH xxxiv. 20; Quint. i. 7. 12). It stood either on or near the rostra, and with its archaic inscription seems to have been restored about 150 B.C. (CP 1919, 74-82; 1920, 176-183), and again later by Augustus (CIL i 2. 25) or Tiberius (or perhaps Claudius). Part of this restored inscription (CIL vi. 1300 =31591; Munchener Sitz.-Ber. 1890, 293-321) was discovered in 1565 (LS ii. 188) and is still preserved in the Palazzo dei Conservatori (HF 890). Cf. Mitt. 1890, 306; 1891, 90; DR 471 472; CIL vi. 31611 (=i 2. p. 193, xi.). The inscription of the column has since been transferred to the Museo Mussolini (Bocconi, Musei Capitolini, 278). There are records of payments for placing it in its niche in 1572 (Arch. Boccapaduli Arm. II. Mazzo iv. No. 52), while Marchionne was not paid till 1574 per hauer fatto la colonna rostrata di suo marmo et li sei rostri et il capitello et l
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, SEP. SCIPIONUM (search)
at much of the damage had already been done in the fourth century; but one, that of L. Scipio Barbatus, consul in 298 B.C., and apparently the first to be buried there, was preserved and is now in the Vatican, together with portions of several others and their original inscriptions. These inscriptions (CIL 12. 6-16=vi. 1284-1294) record the burial of eight members of the family, from Barbatus (vid. sup.) to Paulla Cornelia, wife of a certain Hispallus of unknown date but probably later than 150 B.C. (RE iv. 1600, No. 445). Some of them are written in the Saturnian metre and are extremely valuable for the history of Latin literature and phonology, but they are probably later than the date usually assigned to them. That of Barbatus, for instance, is probably not earlier than the second Punic war (Bticheler, Carm. Lat. Epig. i. Nos. 6-9; W6lfflin, Bayr. Sitz.-Ber. 1892, i. 188-219). Of the sarcophagi, that of Barbatus alone was decorated with a Doric entablature with Ionic volutes. The o
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, STATUAE REGUM ROMANORUM (search)
STATUAE REGUM ROMANORUM the statues of seven kings of Rome- including Titus Tatius and therefore, presumably, excluding Tarquinius Superbus-erected on the Capitoline, probably on the eastern part of the area Capitolina (Cass. Dio xliii. 45; App. BC i. 16; Plin. NH xxxiv. 22). The statues of Romulus and Tatius were togatae sine tunicis, sine anulis; those of Numa,'Cf. GENS IULIA, ARA. Servius Tullius and Tarquinius Priscus had rings on their fingers and were probably of later date (Plin. NH xxxiii. 9-10; xxxiv. 23; Ascon. Scaur. fin.). All of them were probably set up between 350 and 150 B.C. (Gilb. i. 24-25 ; Jord. i. I. 57-58; Rodocanachi, Le Capitole 46).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
cus extra Portam Trigeminam restored, 420. Clivus Capitolinus paved and Porticus built, 122, 463. Circus Maximus restored, 114. Emporium paved, 200. (ca.). Pavement of Forum (?), 232. 173Temple of Fortuna Equestris dedicated, 215. 172Columna rostrata of M. Aemilius Paullus destroyed, 134. 170Basilica Sempronia, 82. 168Porticus Octavia, 426. 167Temple of Penates struck by lightning, 388. 159Porticus built round Area Capitolina, 48. Water clock installed in Basilica Aemilia, 72. 150(ca.). Columna rostrata of Duilius restored, 134. 148Regia burnt and restored, 441. 147Porticus Metelli, 424. 146(after). Temple of Felicitas dedicated, 207. Temples of Juppiter Stator and Juno Regina, 304. 145Temple of Hercules Victor vowed, 256. Assembly moved to Forum, 135, 232. 144-140Q. Marcius Rex repairs Anio Vetus, 13 Aqua Appia, 21 and builds Aqua Marcia, 24. 142Temple of Hercules Vict