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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 10 10 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 3 3 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 3-4 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 8-10 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 153 BC or search for 153 BC in all documents.

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Astyme'des (*)Astumh/dhs), a Rhodian of distinction. On the breaking out of the war between the Romans and Perseus (B. C. 171), he advised his countrymen to side with the former. (Plb. 27.6.3.) After the war, when the Rhodians were threatened with hostilities by the Romans, Astymedes was sent as ambassador to Rome to deprecate their anger. The tenour of his speech on the occasion is censured by Polybius. (30.4, 5; Liv. 45.21-25.) Three years afterwards, he was again sent as ambassador to Rome, and succeeded in bringing about an alliance between the Romans and his countrymen. (Polyb. xxxi, 6, 7.) In B. C. 153, on the occasion of the war with Crete, we find him appointed admiral, and again sent as ambassador to Rome. (Polyb 33.14.) [C.P.
olybius, the historian; and he was also one of the survivors, who, after a detention of 17 years, were permitted to return to their country. (Plb. 30.10, 31.8, 32.7, 8, 33.1; Liv. 45.31; Paus. 7.10.) The baseness of Callicrates was visited on his head,--if, indeed, such a man could feel such a punishment, --in the intense hatred of his countrymen. Men deemed it pollution to use the same bath with him, and the very boys in the streets threw in his teeth the name of traitor. (Plb. 30.20.) In B. C. 153 he dissuaded the league from taking any part in the war of the Rhodians against Crete, on the ground that it did not befit them to go to war at all without the sanction of the Romans. (Plb. 33.15.) Three years after this, B. C. 150, Menalcidas, then general of the league, having been bribed by the Oropians with 10 talents to aid them against the Athenians, from whose garrison in their town they had received injury, engaged Callicrates in the same cause by the promise of half the sum. The p
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or Cato the Censor (search)
sympathy with fine and tender feelings, though some allowance may be made for a little assumed ungraciousness of demeanour, in order to keep up his Catonian character. Nowhere in his writings or his speeches do we meet with generous and elevating sentiments. His strong will and powerful passions of anger and ambition were guided by a keen and cold intellect, and a practical, utilitarian, common sense. Even in the closing years of his protracted life, Cato had no repose. In his 81st year, B. C. 153, he was accused by C. Cassius of some capitale crimen (the nature of which is not recorded), and defended himself in person with unbroken strength, with unfaltering voice, and with unshaken memory. " How hard it is," he said, " for one whose life has been past in a preceding generation, to plead his cause before the men of the present!" (V. Max. 8.7.1; Plut. Cato, 15.) In the very year before his death, he was one of the chief instigators of the third Punic war. The anxiety of the senate
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Luscus, A'nnius 2. T. Annius Luscus, T. F., son, probably, of the preceding, was consul in B. C. 153 (see Fasti). Cicero mentions him as a respectable orator (Brut. 20). In B. C. 133, Luscus appears among the opponents of Tib. Gracchus whom he foiled in the comitia by an insidious question. (Plut. TG 14.) A few words from one of his speeches are extant in Festus (s. v. Satura).
Nobi'lior 4. Q. Fulvius Nobilior, M. F. M. N., son of No. 2, was consul B. C. 153 with T. Annius Luscus. Livy mentions (39.44) a Q. Fulvius Nobilior who was appointed in B. C. 84 one of the triumviri for founding the colonies of Potentia and Pisaurum; and as Cicero says (Brut. 20) that Q. Nobilior, the son of the conqueror of the often in that part of the historian's writings. A consideration of dates will make it almost certain that this Q. Fulvius M. f. must be the same as the consul of B. C. 153; for supposing him to have been sixteen when he was enrolled in the college of the epulones, he would have been forty-three when he was elected consul, the age ahis honour. We therefore conclude that the Q. Nobilior who was triumvir in B. C. 184 must be a different person from the consul of 153. The consuls of the year B. C. 153 entered upon their office on the kalends of January, whereas up to this time the ides of March had been the day on which they took possession of their dignity. T
the contrary, Philon, and therefore the rest, must have lived after the time of Archimedes, as we learn from Tzetzes (Chil. 2.5.152) that Philon, in one of his works, mentions Archimedes. There is no reason, therefore, why we should reject the express statement of Athenaeus (iv. p. 174c.), where he mentions Ctesibius as flourishing in the time of the second Euergetes, Ptolemy Physcon, who began to reign B. C. 146. Fabricius, with odd inconsistency, places the era of Philon at A. U. C. 601=B. C. 153, which is sufficiently correct. Consequently Heron must be placed latcer. (See Schweighäuser, ad Athenaeum, vol. vii. p. 637, &c.; Clinton, F. H. vol. iii. p. 535.) All that we know of his history is derived from his own notices in the work to be mentioned immediately ; that he had been at Alexandria and Rhodes, and had profited by his intercourse with the engineers of both places (pp. 51, 80, 84). Works Among his works is one wherein he took a wide range, treating of the formation of h
the contrary, Philon, and therefore the rest, must have lived after the time of Archimedes, as we learn from Tzetzes (Chil. 2.5.152) that Philon, in one of his works, mentions Archimedes. There is no reason, therefore, why we should reject the express statement of Athenaeus (iv. p. 174c.), where he mentions Ctesibius as flourishing in the time of the second Euergetes, Ptolemy Physcon, who began to reign B. C. 146. Fabricius, with odd inconsistency, places the era of Philon at A. U. C. 601=B. C. 153, which is sufficiently correct. Consequently Heron must be placed latcer. (See Schweighäuser, ad Athenaeum, vol. vii. p. 637, &c.; Clinton, F. H. vol. iii. p. 535.) All that we know of his history is derived from his own notices in the work to be mentioned immediately ; that he had been at Alexandria and Rhodes, and had profited by his intercourse with the engineers of both places (pp. 51, 80, 84). Works Among his works is one wherein he took a wide range, treating of the formation of h
ed them of the consul, he coolly replied that the Romans did not approve of the murder of a general by his own soldiers. The death of Viriathus did not put an immediate stop to the war. After burying Viriathus with great magnificence, his soldiers elected Tantalus as their general ; but the latter was no match for a Roman consul, and before the end of the year was obliged to submit to Caepio. [CAEPIO, No. 6.] The war with Viriathus lasted eight years, according to Appian (App. Hisp. 75), who dates its commencement from the time that Viriathus became the leader of the Lusitanians. Other writers, however, say that the war lasted fourteen years, which must be computed from the beginning of the Celtiberian war, B. C. 153. (Appian, App. Hisp. 60-75; Eutrop. 4.16; Oros. 5.4; Flor. 2.17; Liv. Epit. 54 ; Frontin. 2.5.7, 2.13.4, 3.10.6, 3.11.4, 4.5.22; Vell. 2.1; Aurel. Vict. de Vir. Ill. 71; V. Max. 9.6.4; Diod. Exc. ex xxxii. pp. 591, 597, ed. Wess.; Dio Cass. Fragm. 78, p. 33, ed. Reimar.)