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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 11 11 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 1 1 Browse Search
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Strabo, Geography, Book 13, chapter 4 (search)
itory of Pergamum did not include many places that extended as far as the sea at the Elaïtic and Adramyttene Gulfs. He built up the city and planted Nicephorium with a grove, and the other elder brother,Others make e)kei=nos refer to Eumenes, but the present translator must make it refer too Attallus, unless the text is corrupt. from love of splendor, added sacred buildings and libraries and raised the settlement of Pergamum to what it now is. After a reign of forty-nine yearsBut he died in 159 B.C. (see Pauly-Wissowa, s.v. "Eumenes," p. 1103), thus having reigned 197-159 B.C. Eumenes left his empire to Attallus, his son by Stratonice, the daughter of Ariathres, king of the Cappadocians. He appointed his brother AttalusAttalus Philadelphus. as guardian both of his son, who was extremely young, and of the empire. After a reign of twenty-one years,159-138 B.C. his brother died an old man, having won success in many undertakings; for example, he helped Demetrius, the son of Seleucus
Appian, Syrian Wars (ed. Horace White), CHAPTER VIII (search)
ly in other respects. For this he received the surname of Soter (the Protector), which was first bestowed upon him by the Babylonians. When he was firmly established in the kingdom he sent a crown valued at 10,000 pieces of gold to the Romans as the gift of their former hostage, and also delivered up Leptines, the murderer of Octavius. They accepted the crown, but not Leptines, because they intended to hold the Syrians responsible Y.R. 595 for that crime. Demetrius took the government of B.C. 159 Cappadocia away from Ariarthes and gave it to Olophernes, who was supposed to be the brother of Ariarthes, receiving 1000 talents therefor. The Romans, however, decided that as brothers both Ariarthes and Olophernes should reign together. These princes were deprived of the kingdom -- and their successor, Ariobarzanes, also, a little later -- by Mithridates, king of Pontus. The Mithridatic war grew out of this event, among others, -- a very great war, full of vicissitudes to many nations
Polybius, Histories, book 32, Character of Eumenes (search)
Character of Eumenes King Eumenes was entirely broken in bodily strength, Death and character of Eumenes, B. C. 159. but still maintained his brilliancy of mind. He was a man who in most things was the equal of any king of his time; and in those which were the most important and honourable, was greater and more illustrious than them all. He raised his kingdom to the first rank; First, he succeeded his father in a kingdom reduced to a very few insignificant cities; and he raised it to the level of the largest dynasties of his day. And it was not chance which contributed to this, or a mere sudden catastrophe, it was his own acuteness, indefatigable industry, and personal labour. was exceedingly bountiful; Again, he was exceedingly ambitious of establishing a good reputation, and showed it by doing good services to a very large number of cities, and enriching privately a great many men. And in the third place, he had three brothers grown up and active, and he kept all four of them loya
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, AREA CAPITOLINA (search)
wide, and in front from 40 to 45. Behind the temple there appears to have been only a narrow space, but wide enough for the passage of a procession (Plin. NH viii. 161). Besides the space occupied by the great temple, the area therefore contained something more than one hectare of surface, sufficient for the other temples and monuments that stood in Capitolio-an expression ordinarily interpreted as equivalent to in area Capitolina. The area was surrounded by a wall, and a porticus built in 159 B.C. on the inner side of the wall (Vell. ii. 1. 2, 3. 1). The principal entrance was in the middle of the south-east side, opposite the front of the great temple, where the clivus Capitolinus ended, and was sometimes referred to as fores Capitolii (Suet. Aug. 94; App. BC i. 16; Tac. Hist. iii. 71). A little south of this entrance, near the corner of the area, was the PORTA PANDANA (q.v.), and there may have been others. The area was closed at night and protected by dogs (Cic. pro Rosc. Am. 56;
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
Temple of Apollo Medicus rebuilt (?), 15. 178of Venus near Forum burnt, 551. 174Two (?) Porticus extra Portam Trigeminam restored, 420. Clivus Capitolinus paved and Porticus built, 122, 463. Circus Maximus restored, 114. Emporium paved, 200. (ca.). Pavement of Forum (?), 232. 173Temple of Fortuna Equestris dedicated, 215. 172Columna rostrata of M. Aemilius Paullus destroyed, 134. 170Basilica Sempronia, 82. 168Porticus Octavia, 426. 167Temple of Penates struck by lightning, 388. 159Porticus built round Area Capitolina, 48. Water clock installed in Basilica Aemilia, 72. 150(ca.). Columna rostrata of Duilius restored, 134. 148Regia burnt and restored, 441. 147Porticus Metelli, 424. 146(after). Temple of Felicitas dedicated, 207. Temples of Juppiter Stator and Juno Regina, 304. 145Temple of Hercules Victor vowed, 256. Assembly moved to Forum, 135, 232. 144-140Q. Marcius Rex repairs Anio Vetus, 13 Aqua Appia, 21
A'lcimus (*)/Alkimos), also called Jacimus, or Joachim (*)Ia/keimos), one of the Jewish priests, who espoused the Syrian cause. He was made high priest by Demetrius, about B. C. 161, and was installed in his office by the help of a Syrian army. In consequence of his cruelties he was expelled by the Jews, and obliged to fly to Antioch, but was restored by the help of another Syrian army. He continued in his office, under the protection of the Syrians, till his death, which happened suddenly (B. C. 159) while he was pulling down the wall of the temple that divided the court of the Gentiles from that of the Israelites. (J. AJ 12.9.7; 1 Maceab. vii. ix
v. 35.23); in 181, during the war between Eumenes and Pharnaces (Plb. 25.6); in 167, to congratulate the Romans on their victory over Perseus. Eumenes being in ill-favour at Rome at this time, Attalus was encouraged with hopes of getting the kingdom for himself; but was induced, by the remonstrances of a physician named Stratius, to abandon his designs. (Liv. 45.19, 20; Plb. 30.1-3.) In 164 and 160, he was again sent to Rome. (Plb. 31.9, 32.3, 5.) Attalus succeeded his brother Eumenes in B. C. 159. His first undertaking was the restoration of Ariarathes to his kingdom. (Plb. 32.23.) In 156, he was attacked by Prusias, and found himself compelled to call in the assistance of the Romans and his allies, Ariarathes and Mithridates. In B. C. 154, Prusias was compelled by the threats of the Romans to grant peace, and indemnify Attalus for the losses he had sustained. (Plb. 3.5, 32.25, &c., 33.1, 6, 10, 11; Appian, App. Mith. 3, &c.; Diod. xxxi. Exc. p. 589.) In 152, he sent some troops to
v. 35.23); in 181, during the war between Eumenes and Pharnaces (Plb. 25.6); in 167, to congratulate the Romans on their victory over Perseus. Eumenes being in ill-favour at Rome at this time, Attalus was encouraged with hopes of getting the kingdom for himself; but was induced, by the remonstrances of a physician named Stratius, to abandon his designs. (Liv. 45.19, 20; Plb. 30.1-3.) In 164 and 160, he was again sent to Rome. (Plb. 31.9, 32.3, 5.) Attalus succeeded his brother Eumenes in B. C. 159. His first undertaking was the restoration of Ariarathes to his kingdom. (Plb. 32.23.) In 156, he was attacked by Prusias, and found himself compelled to call in the assistance of the Romans and his allies, Ariarathes and Mithridates. In B. C. 154, Prusias was compelled by the threats of the Romans to grant peace, and indemnify Attalus for the losses he had sustained. (Plb. 3.5, 32.25, &c., 33.1, 6, 10, 11; Appian, App. Mith. 3, &c.; Diod. xxxi. Exc. p. 589.) In 152, he sent some troops to
Dolabella 4. Cn. Cornelius Dolabella, was curule aedile in B. C. 165, in which year he and his colleague, Sex. Julius Caesar, had the Hecyra of Terence performed at the festival of the Megalesia. In B. C. 159 he was consul with M. Fulvius Nobilior. (Title of Terent. Hecyr.; Suet. Vit. Terent. 5.)
inst Eumenes, who had sent him, and inducing him to set up for himself. (Plb. 32.5.) The last years of the reign of Eumenes seem to have been disturbed by frequent hostilities on the part of Prusias, king of Bithynia, and the Gauls of Galatia; but he had the good-fortune or dexterity to avoid coming to an open rupture either with Rome or his brother Attalus. (Plb. 31.9, 32.5; Diod. xxxi. Exc. Vales. p. 582.) His death, which is not mentioned by any ancient writer, must have taken place in B. C. 159, after a reign of 39 years. (Strab. xiii. p.624; Clinton, F. H. iii. pp. 403, 406.) According to Polybius (32.23), Eumenes was a man of a feeble bodily constitution, but of great vigour and power of mind, which is indeed sufficiently evinced by the history of his reign: his policy was indeed crafty and temporizing, but indicative of much sagacity; and he raised his kingdom from a petty state to one of the highest consideration. All the arts of peace were assiduously protected by him: Per
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