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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 11 11 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 159 BC or search for 159 BC in all documents.

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A'lcimus (*)/Alkimos), also called Jacimus, or Joachim (*)Ia/keimos), one of the Jewish priests, who espoused the Syrian cause. He was made high priest by Demetrius, about B. C. 161, and was installed in his office by the help of a Syrian army. In consequence of his cruelties he was expelled by the Jews, and obliged to fly to Antioch, but was restored by the help of another Syrian army. He continued in his office, under the protection of the Syrians, till his death, which happened suddenly (B. C. 159) while he was pulling down the wall of the temple that divided the court of the Gentiles from that of the Israelites. (J. AJ 12.9.7; 1 Maceab. vii. ix
v. 35.23); in 181, during the war between Eumenes and Pharnaces (Plb. 25.6); in 167, to congratulate the Romans on their victory over Perseus. Eumenes being in ill-favour at Rome at this time, Attalus was encouraged with hopes of getting the kingdom for himself; but was induced, by the remonstrances of a physician named Stratius, to abandon his designs. (Liv. 45.19, 20; Plb. 30.1-3.) In 164 and 160, he was again sent to Rome. (Plb. 31.9, 32.3, 5.) Attalus succeeded his brother Eumenes in B. C. 159. His first undertaking was the restoration of Ariarathes to his kingdom. (Plb. 32.23.) In 156, he was attacked by Prusias, and found himself compelled to call in the assistance of the Romans and his allies, Ariarathes and Mithridates. In B. C. 154, Prusias was compelled by the threats of the Romans to grant peace, and indemnify Attalus for the losses he had sustained. (Plb. 3.5, 32.25, &c., 33.1, 6, 10, 11; Appian, App. Mith. 3, &c.; Diod. xxxi. Exc. p. 589.) In 152, he sent some troops to
v. 35.23); in 181, during the war between Eumenes and Pharnaces (Plb. 25.6); in 167, to congratulate the Romans on their victory over Perseus. Eumenes being in ill-favour at Rome at this time, Attalus was encouraged with hopes of getting the kingdom for himself; but was induced, by the remonstrances of a physician named Stratius, to abandon his designs. (Liv. 45.19, 20; Plb. 30.1-3.) In 164 and 160, he was again sent to Rome. (Plb. 31.9, 32.3, 5.) Attalus succeeded his brother Eumenes in B. C. 159. His first undertaking was the restoration of Ariarathes to his kingdom. (Plb. 32.23.) In 156, he was attacked by Prusias, and found himself compelled to call in the assistance of the Romans and his allies, Ariarathes and Mithridates. In B. C. 154, Prusias was compelled by the threats of the Romans to grant peace, and indemnify Attalus for the losses he had sustained. (Plb. 3.5, 32.25, &c., 33.1, 6, 10, 11; Appian, App. Mith. 3, &c.; Diod. xxxi. Exc. p. 589.) In 152, he sent some troops to
Dolabella 4. Cn. Cornelius Dolabella, was curule aedile in B. C. 165, in which year he and his colleague, Sex. Julius Caesar, had the Hecyra of Terence performed at the festival of the Megalesia. In B. C. 159 he was consul with M. Fulvius Nobilior. (Title of Terent. Hecyr.; Suet. Vit. Terent. 5.)
inst Eumenes, who had sent him, and inducing him to set up for himself. (Plb. 32.5.) The last years of the reign of Eumenes seem to have been disturbed by frequent hostilities on the part of Prusias, king of Bithynia, and the Gauls of Galatia; but he had the good-fortune or dexterity to avoid coming to an open rupture either with Rome or his brother Attalus. (Plb. 31.9, 32.5; Diod. xxxi. Exc. Vales. p. 582.) His death, which is not mentioned by any ancient writer, must have taken place in B. C. 159, after a reign of 39 years. (Strab. xiii. p.624; Clinton, F. H. iii. pp. 403, 406.) According to Polybius (32.23), Eumenes was a man of a feeble bodily constitution, but of great vigour and power of mind, which is indeed sufficiently evinced by the history of his reign: his policy was indeed crafty and temporizing, but indicative of much sagacity; and he raised his kingdom from a petty state to one of the highest consideration. All the arts of peace were assiduously protected by him: Per
C. 172. and sent with an army against the Ligurian mountaineers. He conquered them in a pitched battle, after great slaughter. The remainder of the whole tribe who had escaped from the carnage determined on surrendering themselves to the mercy of the Roman general; but they were all sold as slaves, and their city plundered and destroyed. When this news reached Rome, the senate disapproved of Popillius's proceedings, and decreed, in spite of his haughty and angry remonstrances, that he should restore the Ligurians to liberty, to their country, and, as far as possible, to their property. Popillius, however, acted in direct opposition to this decree. On his return to Rome he was called to account, but escaped through the influence of his family. (Liv. 42.22.) Nevertheless, Popillius obtained (B. C. 159) the most honourable office of Rome, that of censor, which he exercised, as may be presumed, with vigour and severity. (Fast. Capitol.; Liv. Epit. 47; Gel. 4.20; Nonius, s. v. Strigosus.
Nobi'lior 3. M. Fulvius Nobilior, M. F. M. N., son of No. 2, was tribune of the plebs B. C. 171 (Liv. 42.32), curtle aedile B. C. 166, the year in which the Andria of Terence was performed (Tit. Andsr. Terent.), and consul B. C. 159, with Cn. Cornelius Dolabella. Of the events of his consulship we have no records; but as the triumphal fasti assign him a triumph in the following year over the Eleates, a Ligurian people, he must have carried on war in Liguria.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Sci'pio Nasica (search)
eceived the surname of Corculum (corculum a corde dicebant antiqui solertem et acutum, Festus, s. v.). He married a daughter of Scipio Africanus the elder. He is first mentioned in B. C. 168, when he served with distinction under L. Aemilius Paulus in Macedonia. He was consul for the first time in B. C. 162 with C. Marcius Figulus, but abdicated, together with his colleague, almost immediately after they had entered upon their office, on account of some fault in the auspices. He was censor B. C. 159 with M. Popillius Laenas, when he enacted, together with his colleague, that no statues of public men should be allowed to be erected in the forum without the express sanction of the senate or the people. In his censorship the clepsydra was for the first time introduced at Rome. He was consul a second time in B. C. 155 with M. Claudius Marcellus, and subdued the Dalmatians. He was a firm upholder of the old Roman habits and manners, and a strong opponent of all innovations, of which he gav
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
f his life. According to one story, after embarking at Brundisium, he was never heard of more; according to others, he died at Stymphalus, in Arcadia (Auson. Epist. xviii.), in Letucadia, or at Patrae, in Achaia. One of his biographers said he was drowned, with all the fruits of his sojourn in Greece, on his home-passage. But the prevailing report was, that his translations of Menander were lost at sea, and that grief for their loss caused his death. He died in the 36th year of his age, in B. C. 159, or, according to St. Jerome (Chron. Ol. 155, 3), in the year following. He left a daughter, but nothing is known of his family. Works Six comedies, all belonging to the Fabula Palliata, are all that remain to us; and since in these we can verify the citations from him in the grammarians, they are probably all that Terence produced. His later versions of Menander were, in all likelihood, from their number and the short time in which they were made, merely studies for future dramas of hi
Thea'ridas 2. An Achaean who was sent by his countrymen as ambassador to Rome in B. C. 159. (Plb. 32.17.) In B. C. 147, he was again placed at the head of an embassy which was designed to excuse the insult offered to the Roman legate Aurelius Orestes, but having on his way to Italy met with the Roman deputy Sex. Julius Caesar, who was appointed to investigate the subject, he was compelled to return with him to Achaia. (Id. 38.2.) [E.H.B]
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