hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 84 84 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 7 7 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 3 3 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 43-45 (ed. Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Strabo, Geography. You can also browse the collection for 168 BC or search for 168 BC in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Strabo, Geography, Book 7, chapter 7 (search)
people keep revolting; indeed, the Romans, after being set up as masters by the inhabitants, encamp in their very houses.Now standing empty. Be this as it may, PolybiusPolybius 30.16. says that Paulus,Aemilius Paulus Macedonicus (consul 182 and 168 B.C.) in 168 B.C. after his subjection of Perseus and the Macedonians, destroyed seventy cities of the Epeirotes (most of which, he adds, belonged to the Molossi),See 7. 7. 8. and reduced to slavery one hundred and fifty thousand people. Neverthe168 B.C. after his subjection of Perseus and the Macedonians, destroyed seventy cities of the Epeirotes (most of which, he adds, belonged to the Molossi),See 7. 7. 8. and reduced to slavery one hundred and fifty thousand people. Nevertheless, I shall attempt, in so far as it is appropriate to my description and as my knowledge reaches, to traverse the several different parts, beginning at the seaboard of the Ionian Gulf—that is, where the voyage out of the Adrias ends. Of this seaboard, then, the first parts are those about Epidamnus and Apollonia. From Apollonia to Macedonia one travels the Egnatian Road, towards the east; it has been measured by Roman miles and marked by pillars as far as CypselaNow Ipsala. and the HebrusN
Strabo, Geography, Book 7, chapter fragments (search)
mothrace as Imbros is. From Caracoma one comes to Doriscus,Now Tulsa. where Xerxes enumerated his army; then to the Hebrus, which is navigable inland to Cypsela,Now Ipsala. a distance of one hundred and twenty stadia. This, hesc. Strabo. says, was the boundary of the Macedonia which the Romans first took away from Perseus and afterwards from the Pseudo-Philip.The younger brother of Perseus, whom Perseus regarded as his heir. Now Paulus,Aemilius Paulus Macedonicus, in his second consulship, 168 B.C., defeated Perseus near Pydna. who captured Perseus, annexed the Epeirotic tribes to Macedonia, divided the country into four parts for purposes of administration, and apportioned one part to Amphipolis, another to Thessaloniceia, another to Pella, and another to the Pelagonians. Along the Hebrus live the Corpili, and, still farther up the river, the Brenae, and then, farthermost of all, the Bessi, for the river is navigable thus far. All these tribes are given to brigandage, but most o