hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 49 49 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 12 12 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 43-45 (ed. Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 169 BC or search for 169 BC in all documents.

Your search returned 49 results in 47 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5
Age'polis *)Age/polis, (of Rhodes, was sent by his countrymen as ambassador to the consul Q. Marcius Philippus, B. C. 169, in the war with Perseus, and had an interview with him near Heraceleum in Macedonia. In the following year, B. C. 168, he went as ambassador to Rome to deprecate the anger of the Romans. (Plb. 28.14, 15, 29.4, 7; Liv. 45.3.)
Agesi'lochus or HEGESI'LOCHES (*)Agesi/loxos, *)Aghsi/loxos, *(Hghsi/loxos), was the chief magistrate (Prytanis) of the Rhodians, on the breaking out of the war between Rome and Perseus in B. C. 171, and recommended his countrymen to espouse the side of the Romans. He was sent as ambassador to Rome in B. C. 169, and to the consul Aemilius Paullus in Macedonia, B. C. 168. (Plb. 27.3, 28.2, 14, 29.4.)
A'lcithus (*)/Alkiqos), sent as ambassador by the Achaeans to Ptolemy Philometor, B. C. 169, when they heard that the Anacleteria (see Dict. of Ant. s. v.) were to be celebrated in his honour. (Plb. 28.10, 16
Androni'cus (*)Andro/nikos), a MACEDONIAN, is first mentioned in the war against Antiochus, B. C. 190, as the governor of Ephesus. (Liv. 37.13.) He is spoken of in B. C. 169 as one of the generals of Perseus, king of Macedonia, and was sent by him to burn the dock-yards at Thessalonica, which he delayed doing, wishing to gratify the Romans, according to Diodorus, or thinking that the king would repent of his purpose, as Livy states. He was shortly afterwards put to death by Perseus. (Liv. 44.10; Diod. Exc. p. 579, Wess.; Appian, de Reb. Mac. 14
Archede'mus 3. An Aetolian (called Archidamus by Livy), who commanded the Aetolian troops which assisted the Romans in their war with Philip. In B. C. 199 he compelled Philip to raise the siege of Thaumaci (Liv. 32.4), and took an active part in the battle of Cynoscephalae, B. C. 197, in which Philip was defeated. (Plb. 18.4.) When the war Broke out between the Romans and the Aetolians, he was sent as ambassador to the Achaeans to solicit their assistance, B. C. 192 (Liv. 35.48); and on the defeat of Antiochus the Great in the following year, he went as ambassador to the consul M'. Acilius Glabrio to sue for peace. (Plb. 20.9.) In B. C. 169 he was denounced to the Romans by Lyciscus as one of their enemies. (Plb. 28.4.) he joined Perseus the same year, and accompanied the Macedonian King in his flight after his defeat in 168. (Liv. 43.23, 24, 44.43.)
Ba'lanus a Gaulish prince beyond the Alps, who sent ambassadors offering to assist the Romans in their Macedonian war, B. C. 169. (Liv. 44.14.)
Cae'lius 2. L. Caelius, commanded as legate in Illyricum in the war against Perseus, B. C. 169, and was defeated in an attempt which he made to obtain possession of Uscana in the country of the Penestae, a town which was garrisoned by the Macedonians. (Liv. 43.21.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Ca'pito, Fonteius 2. P. Fonteius Capito, was praetor in B. C. 169, and obtained Sardinia as his province. (Liv. 43.13, 17.)
Carvi'lius 4. C. Carvilius of Spoletium, negotiated on behalf of the Roman garrison the surrender of Uscana, a town of the Penestae, to Perseus in B. C. 169. (Liv. 43.18, 19.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or Cato the Censor (search)
were the condemnation and tears of that father's foes. With greenish-gray eyes and sandy hair, an iron frame, and a stentorian voice, he gave utterance to such bitter invectives as to provoke the pungent Greek epigram recorded by Plutarch. (Cato, 1) *Purro\n, pandake/thn, glauko/mmaton, ou)de\ qano/nta *Po/rkion ei)s a)i/+dhn *Persefo/nh de/xetai. His resistance to luxury continued. In B. C. 181, he urged the adoption of the Lex Orchia for restricting the number of guests at banquets. In B. C. 169 (according to Cicero, Senect. 5, or several years earlier, according to the epitomizer of Livy Epit. xli.) he supported the proposal of the Lex Voconia, the provisions of which were calculated to prevent the accumulation of wealth in the hands of women. In some questions of foreign policy we find him taking the side of the oppressed. The proconsular governors of both Spains compelled the provincial inhabitants to pay their corn-assessments in money at a high arbitrary commutation, and th
1 2 3 4 5