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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 16 16 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 43-45 (ed. Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.). You can also browse the collection for 178 BC or search for 178 BC in all documents.

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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 41 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.), chapter 9 (search)
confederacy, and ten ships of five banks of oars, in case the consul should wish to launch any from the docks. The same number of infantry and cavalry were decreed for Histria as for Sardinia. Also, the consuls were directed to send one legion with three hundred cavalry and five thousand allied infantry and two hundred and fifty cavalryI.e. of the allies, the three hundred being Roman. to Marcus TitiniusThere were two praetors of this name: only three praetors are listed for the year 178 B.C. in XL. lix. 5. in Spain. Before the consuls drew lots for their provinces, the prodigies were reported: a stone fell from the sky into the grove of Mars in the territory of Crustumerium; a boy whose body was without limbs was born near Rome and a four-legged snake was seen; and at Capua also many buildings in the forum were struckB.C. 177 by lightning; and at Puteoli two ships were burned by lightning bolts. In the midst of the announcement of these occurrences, a wolf was pursu
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 41 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.), chapter 19 (search)
rty victims. And indeed the Gallic and Ligurian uprising, which had broken out in the beginning of the year, was quickly suppressed with no great effort; now the anxiety as to the Macedonian War beset them, since Perseus was stirring up conflicts between the Dardanians and the Bastarnae.Cf. especially XL. lvii. for Philip's plan to profit by the wars of these peoples. And the ambassadorsThis embassy has not been mentioned, since Livy has said little about Macedonian affairs since 178 B.C. He now proceeds to fill up that gap. who had been sent to investigate the situation in Macedonia had already returned to Rome and had reported that war in Dardania was now in progress. At the same time envoys had also arrived from King Perseus, who were to explain on his behalfAppian, Macedonian Wars IX. xi. 1 refers to this embassy, which Livy has not mentioned before: o(de\ Perseus e)te/rous e)/pempe pre/sbeis th\n u(po/noian e)klu/wn. that he had neither invited the Bastarnae nor w
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 41 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.), chapter 26 (search)
The Celtiberians in Spain, who had surrendered to Tiberius GracchusGracchus went to Spain in 179 B.C. (XL. xlvii. 1); his return and triumph in 177 B.C. were reported at vi. 4 and vii. 2 above. after their defeat in the war, had remained quiet while Marcus TitiniusTitinius was one of the unnamed praetors for 178 B.C. (XL. lix. 5). held the province as praetor. They rebelled on theB.C. 174 arrival of Appius ClaudiusThe election of Claudius as praetor in 175 B.C. was presumably recorded in the lost text of chap. Xviii. and began the war by a surprise attack on the Roman camp. It was about daybreak, when the sentinels were on the rampart and the outposts were on guard at the gates, that they saw the enemy coming afar off and called the troops to arms. Appius Claudius, after displaying the signal for battle and briefly exhorting the troops, led them out by three gates at once. The Celtiberians met them as they came out, and at first there was a drawn battle, since on acco