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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 13 13 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 18 BC or search for 18 BC in all documents.

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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, POMERIUM (search)
to territory in Italy (Sen. de brev. vit. 13; Mommsen, Staatsrecht ii. 738), but later it was expanded to cover the ager barbaricus (Hist. Aug. Aurel. 21). Of Sulla's extension nothing is known, nor of similar action ascribed to Julius Caesar (Cass. Dio xliii. 50), Augustus (Tac. Ann. xii. 23; Cass. Dio v. 6), Nero, Trajan and Aurelian (Hist. Aug. Aurel. 21). A recent attempt has been made (BC 1919, 24-32) by Laffranchi to show that Augustus' extension of the pomerium occurred thrice, in 27, 18 and 8 B.C., from an examination of his coins. Those used as evidence are Cohen, Aug. 114, 116, 117 (not 177); Babelon, Iulia 153, 155, 156; BM. Imp. i. p. 102, Nos. 628-630; 104, Nos. 637-642; cf. p. 29. An extension by Claudius in 49 A.D. is proved by unimpeachable literary testimony (Tac. Ann. xii. 24; Gell. xiii. 14. 7) and by the discovery of inscribed terminal cippi. These rectangular cippi bear on the top the word Pomerium, on the front the inscription recording the fact of the extension
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, SEP. C. SULPICI PLATORINI (search)
SEP. C. SULPICI PLATORINI the family tomb of C. Sulpicius Platorinus, triumvir monetalis in 18 B.C., on the right bank of the Tiber, close to the end of the pons Agrippae and just inside the later Aurelian wall, excavated in 1880 (NS 1880, 129-138; 1883, 372; 1896, 467-469; BC 1880, 136-138; Mitt. 1889, 286; HJ 650). It was a rectangular structure, 7.44 metres long and 7.12 wide, with the entrance on the west; the stylobate and front part of the walls were of travertine, the inner walls of brick-faced concrete, and the pavement of white mosaic. In the niches were cinerary urns with inscriptions, and on the pavement were found two statues of heroic size and a bust. The inscriptions found in the tomb date from the time of Augustus to that of the Flavians (CIL vi. 31761-31768a). It has been reconstructed in the Museo Nazionale Romano (BA 1911,365; PT 68, 71, 242).