hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 38 38 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 6 6 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 5 5 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.). You can also browse the collection for 181 BC or search for 181 BC in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 38 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.), chapter 47 (search)
an his distinction; when the tribunes of the people, brave and energetic men, not long ago were opposing theB.C. 187 triumph of Quintus Fabius Labeo,In XXXVII. lx. 6 Livy quoted Valerius Antias as the authority for this triumph and seemed to have no other information about it. you checked them by your authority; he triumphed, although his enemies circulated the story, not that he had waged an illegal war, but that he had not set eyes on an enemy at all;In XL. xxxviii. 9 the consuls of 181 B.C. are said to have been the first to triumph without having done any fighting. I who have so often fought with a hundred thousand of the fiercest enemies, who captured or killed more than forty thousand men, who took two of their camps, who left everything on this side of the ridges of Taurus more peaceful than is the land of Italy, am not only cheated out of my triumph but am pleading my case before you, conscript Fathers, with my own lieutenants as my accusers! Their charge, as you ha
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.), chapter 51 (search)
ide door which was out of the way and especially adapted to a stealthy departure, and when he found that this too was blocked by guards stationed around it, he called for the poison which he had long kept ready for such emergencies. Let us, he said, relieve the Roman people of their long anxiety, since they find it tedious to wait for the death of an old man.Nepos (Hannibal 13) gives his age at his death as 70, but says that different authorities place his death in 183, 182, and 181 B.C. B.C. 183 Neither magnificent nor memorable will be the victory which Flamininus will win over a man unarmed and betrayed. How much the manners of the Roman people have changed, this day in truth will prove. Their fathers sent word to King Pyrrhus, an enemy in arms, commanding an army in Italy, warning him to beware of poison: these Romans have sent an ambassador of consular rank to urge upon Prusias the crime of murdering his guest. Then, cursing the person and the king