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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 38 38 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 6 6 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 5 5 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.). You can also browse the collection for 181 BC or search for 181 BC in all documents.

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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 40 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.), chapter 41 (search)
the cognomen Flaccus, unless he had been adopted by some Fulvius Nobilior, and of such an adoption there is no record. There is moreover no Q. Fulvius Nobilior known to have lived at this time. One naturally assumes from Livy's language here that Q. Fulvii refers to the consul of 180 B.C., but no brother Marcus is mentioned elsewhere. The consul of 179 B.C. had a brother Marcus (xxx. 4 above), but it is not likely that after serving in some unspecified capacity under his brother in Spain in 181 B.C. he should have served as military tribune under his cousin in 180 B.C. in Italy. The consul of 179 B.C., during his censorship in 174 B.C., expelled from the senate his own brother, and Valerius Maximus (II. vii. 5, repeated by Frontinus, Strat. IV. i. 31) asserts that the degradation was due to the discharge of a legion of which he was military tribune. The brother is called simply Fulvius, with no praenomen. Livy (XLI. xxvii. 2) and Velleius (I. x. 6) likewise refer to the expulsion, the
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.), chapter 6 (search)
s hatred should break out betimes was the consequence of the arrival in Rome of King Eumenes,B.C. 173 bringing with him a memorandum which he had prepared, after thorough investigation, as to Perseus' preparations for war. About the same time five commissioners were sent to the king to look into the situation in Macedonia. They were also instructed to proceed to Alexandria for the purpose of renewing the friendship of the Romans with Ptolemy.Ptolemy V (Epiphanes) had been succeeded in 181 B.C. by the boy Ptolemy VI (Philometor), but Livy has not previously mentioned the fact. The commissioners were the following: Gaius Valerius, Gaius Lutatius Cerco, Quintus Baebius Sulca, Marcus Cornelius Mammula, Marcus Caecilius Denter. From King AntiochusFor the Romanizing of Antiochus Epiphanes, cf. XLI. xx. l ff. also came ambassadors about the same time: their chief, Apollonius, when he was given an audience before the senate, made explanations for the king, giving many plausib
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.), chapter 29 (search)
, apart from the fact that he had promised aid directly to the Romans, was from the time of his alliance in marriage with Eumenes in harmony with the latter in all plans for peace or war.Cf. XXXVIII. xxxix. 6; on Ariarathes' pro-Romanism, above, xix. 3-6. Antiochus was indeed threatening the kingdom of Egypt, in scorn of the youth of the king and the sluggishness of his guardians;Cf. Polybius XXVII. 19; Ptolemy VI Philometor was about 16 at this time, having succeeded to the throne in 181 B.C. His tutors were Eulaeus and Lenaeus; the former is accused of cowardice by Polybius XXVIII. 21. and he expected, by raising disputes about Hollow Syria,The district of Damascus, and extending to the north, between Lebanon and Antilebanon; it had first belonged to Seleucus, was conquered by Ptolemy Philadelphus in 280 and held by Egypt till 218; it was retaken by Antiochus the Great in 201-198, and given by him as dowry for his daughter Cleopatra, mother of the reigning Ptolemy. to have a ca
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.), chapter 34 (search)
nlisted, again voluntarily, in the army which was sent against the Aetolians and King Antiochus.191 B.C., cf. XXXVI. i. ff. By Manius Acilius I was given the rank of centurion of the forward first century of the main formation. When King Antiochus had been driven out and the Aetolians beaten, we were brought back to Italy; and twice after that I was in campaigns where the legionsB.C. 171 served for a year. Then I campaigned twice in Spain, once when Quintus Fulvius Flaccus was praetor,181 B.C., cf. XL. i. 1, xvi. 7-10, xxx —xxxiii, xxxvi. 10-11 and xxxix —xl. and again when Tiberius Sempronius Gracchus held that office.180 B.C., cf. XL. xxxv. 2, xl. 14. I was brought home by Flaccus along with the others whom he brought with him from the province for his triumph because of their bravery;Cf. XL. xliii. 4-7. I went back to the province because Tiberius Gracchus asked me. Four times within a few years I held the rank of chief centurion; thirty-four times I was rewarded f