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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 32 32 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 7 7 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 5 5 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 1 1 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 43-45 (ed. Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 183 BC or search for 183 BC in all documents.

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ally belonged to the Fulvia gens, but was adopted into the Manlia gens, probably by the above-mentioned Acidinus. (Vell. 2.8.) He was praetor B. C. 188, and had the province of Hispania Citerior allotted to him, where he remained till B. C. 186. In the latter year he defeated the Celtiberi, and had it not been for the arrival of his successor would have reduced the whole people to subjection. He applied for a triumph in consequence, but obtained only an ovation. (Liv. 38.35, 39.21, 29.) In B. C. 183 he was one of the ambassadors sent into Gallia Transalpina, and was also appointed one of the triumvirs for founding the Latin colony of Aquileia, which was however not founded till B. C. 181. (Liv. 39.54, 55, 40.34.) He was consul B. C. 179, (Liv. 40.43,) with his own brother, Q. Fulvius Flaccus, which is the only instance of two brothers holding the consulship at the same time. (Fast. Capitol.; Vell. 2.8.) At the election of Acidinus, M. Scipio declared him to be virum bonum, egregiumque
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Agesi'polis Iii. the 31st of the Agid line, was the son of Agesipolis, and grandson of Cleombrotus II. After the death of Cleomenes he was elected king while still a minor, and placed under the guardianship of his uncle Cleomenes. (Plb. 4.35.) He was however soon deposed by his colleague Lycurgus, after the death of Cleomenes. We hear of him next in B. C. 195, when he was at the head of the Lacedaemonian exiles, who joined Flamininus in his attack upon Nabis, the tyrant of Lacedaemon. (Liv. 34.26.) He formed one of an embassy sent about B. C. 183 to Rome by the Lacedaemonian exiles, and, with his companions, was intercepted by pirates and killed. (Plb. 24.11.) [C.P.M]
Albi'nus 14. SP. POSTUMIUS ALBINUS PAULLULUS, A. F. A. N., probably a brother of No. 13 and 15, perhaps obtained the surname of Paullulus, as being small of stature, to distinguish him more accurately from his two brothers. He was praetor in Sicily, B. C. 183, and consul, 174. (Liv. 39.45, 41.26, 43.2.)
Apelles 2. Perhaps a son of the preceding, was a friend of Philip V., and accompanied his son Demetrius to Rome, B. C. 183. (Plb. 23.14, &c., 24.1.)
Apollodo'rus 5. A BOEOTIAN, who together with Epaenetus came as ambassador from Boeotia to Messenia, in B. C. 183, just at the time when the Messenians, terrified by Lycortas, the general of the Achaeans, were inclined to negotiate for peace. The influence of the Boeotian ambassadors decided the question, and the Messenians concluded peace with the Achaeans. (Plb. 14.12.)
Arcesila'us 3. One of the ambassadors sent to Rome by the Lacedaesmonian exiles about B. C. 183, who was intercepted by pirates and killed. (Plb. 24.11.)
he preceding, was a child at his accession, and reigned B. C. 220-163, about 57 years. (Diod. l.c. ; Just. 29.1; Plb. 4.2.) He married Antiochis, the daughter of Antiochus III., king of Syria, and, in consequence of this alliance, assisted Antiochus in his war against the Romans. After the defeat of Antiochus by the Romans, B. C. 190, Ariarathes sued for peace in 188, which he obtained on favourable terms, as his daughter was about that time betrothed to Eumenes, the ally of the Romans. In B. C. 183-179, he assisted Eumenes in his war against Pharnaces. Polybius mentions that a Roman embassy was sent to Ariarathes after the death of Antiochus IV., who died B. C. 164. Antiochis, the wife of Ariarathes, at first bore him no children, and accordingly introduced two supposititious ones, who were called Ariarathes and Holophernes. Subsequently, however, she bore her husband two daughters and a son, Mithridates, afterwards Ariarathes V., and then informed Ariarathes of the deceit she had pr
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
he preceding, was a child at his accession, and reigned B. C. 220-163, about 57 years. (Diod. l.c. ; Just. 29.1; Plb. 4.2.) He married Antiochis, the daughter of Antiochus III., king of Syria, and, in consequence of this alliance, assisted Antiochus in his war against the Romans. After the defeat of Antiochus by the Romans, B. C. 190, Ariarathes sued for peace in 188, which he obtained on favourable terms, as his daughter was about that time betrothed to Eumenes, the ally of the Romans. In B. C. 183-179, he assisted Eumenes in his war against Pharnaces. Polybius mentions that a Roman embassy was sent to Ariarathes after the death of Antiochus IV., who died B. C. 164. Antiochis, the wife of Ariarathes, at first bore him no children, and accordingly introduced two supposititious ones, who were called Ariarathes and Holophernes. Subsequently, however, she bore her husband two daughters and a son, Mithridates, afterwards Ariarathes V., and then informed Ariarathes of the deceit she had pr
Caesar 3. L. JULIUS (CAESAR), probably son of No. 2, praetor B. C. 183, had the province of Gallia Cisalpina, and was commanded to prevent the Transalpine Gauls, who had come into Italy, from building the town of Aquileia, which they had commenced. (Liv. 39.45.)
Chaeron (*Xai/rwn), or, according to another reading, CHARON, a Lacedaemonian, who appears to have belonged to the party of Nabis; for we find him at Rome in B. C. 183 as the representative of those who had been banished or condemned to death by the Achaeans when they took Sparta in B. C. 188, and restored the exiled enemies of the tyrant. On this occasion the object of Chaeron's mission was obtained. (Plb. 24.4; Liv. 39.48; comp. Plut. Phil. 17.) He was again one of the ambassadors sent to Rome in B. C. 181, to inform the senate of the recent admission of Lacedaemon for the second time into the Achaean league and of the terms of the union. (See p. 569a.; Plb. 25.2; Liv. 40.2, 20.) Polybius represents him as a clever young man, but a profligate demagogue; and accordingly we find him in the ensuing year wielding a sort of brief tyranny at Sparta, squandering the public money, and dividing lands, unjustly seized, among the lowest of the people. Apollonides and other commissioners were
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