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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 28 28 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 5 5 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 3 3 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 43-45 (ed. Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight). You can also browse the collection for 184 BC or search for 184 BC in all documents.

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See silk. It is frequently mixed with cotton. Spun-sil′ver. Thread of coarse silk, or singles, wound with flattened silver wire. Spun-yarn. (Nautical.) A line formed of a number of yarns twisted together, but not laid up. Used for seizings, serving, etc. Spur. Spur. 1. (Manege.) An instrument attached to the heel, and having a rowel or wheel of points to prick a horse's side. Spurs were used by the Greeks and Romans. They are referred to by Plautus (died B. C. 184) and by other Latin authors. The rim is the part inclosing the heel of the boot; the neck, the part between the rowel and the rim; the rowel, a wheel with sharp radial points. Spurs are represented on seals of the eleventh century. They were common among the Saxons, being made of brass or iron, and fastened to the shoe by a leathern thong. Instead of a rowel, the rear had a single fixed, sharp point. The rowel is noticed in the reign of Henry III. Anciently the knight wore golden sp