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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 23 23 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 2 2 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 43-45 (ed. Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 43-45 (ed. Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 1 1 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 43-45 (ed. Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.). You can also browse the collection for 186 BC or search for 186 BC in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 43 (ed. Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.), chapter 11 (search)
Italy, except those who were absent on public business, while those who were in Rome were not to go more than a mile away from Rome.A similar, but even stricter, emergency measure is recorded in XXXVI. iii. 3 (191 B.C.), just before the campaigns against Antiochus. These matters were carried out as the senate voted. The consular elections were held on the twenty-sixth of January. The consuls elected were Quintus Marcius Philippus for the second timeHis previous consulship was in 186 B.C., cf. XXXIX. viii ff.; he had been envoy to Greece and to Perseus just before the outbreak of the war, XLII. xxxviii-xlvii. and Gnaeus Servilius Caepio. Two days later there were elected as praetors Gaius Decimius, Marcus Claudius Marcellus.He was tribune in 171 B.C. (XLII. xxxii. 7), going out of office on December 9th of that year; the interval of a year and three months was apparently regularly regarded as fulfilling the requirement of two years which, according to the Lex Villia Annalis
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 44 (ed. Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.), chapter 9 (search)
because the fires of the king's camp at the Elpe├╝s were in sight. Then the siege began, both with assaults and with field-works and engines, both from land and sea, for the fleet, too, had arrived and occupied the shore side. The younger Romans even captured the lowest part of the wall by turning to military use a performance of the arena. It was the custom then, before there had been introduced the present extravaganceLivy notes the beginnings of lavishness in shows as early as 186 B.C., see XXXIX. xxii. 2, XLI. xxvii. 6, and below, xviii. 8. of cramming the arena with animals from all over the earth, to hunt out various sorts of spectacles, for one race with four-horse chariots and one with bareback riders hardly occupied the space of an hour for the two events. As one of these performances, groups of about sixtySixty was the usual number of soldiers in the so-called century. youths (occasionally more at more elaborate games) entered under arms. Their entranceB.C. 1