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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 23 23 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 2 2 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 43-45 (ed. Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 43-45 (ed. Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 1 1 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Letter XIX: ad familiares 7.1 (search)
atores: on Cicero's own distaste for gladiatorial contests, cf. Att. 2.1.1 Kal. Iunus eunti mihi Antium et gladiatores M. Metelli cupide relinquenti, etc. operam et oleum perdidisse: a proverbial expression probably applied originally to an article spoiled in cooking; cf. tum pol ego et oleum et operant perdidi, Plaut. Poen. 332. The use of alliteration in such everyday expressions in all languages is well known. Cf. Intr. 93, 102. venationes: from the introduction of the venatio at Rome in 186 B.C. , it was a favorite form of amusement with the people, and was carried to an almost incredible pitch of extravagance and barbarism by the later emperors. venabulo: the elephants were attacked with javelins by the Gaetulians (Plin. N. H. 8.20). misericordia: cf. introd. note. Galli Canini: L. Caninius Gallus, as tribune in 56 B.C. , proposed that the restoration of King Ptolemy should be entrusted to Pompey (Q. fr. 2.2.3). In the year following his tribuneship (55 B.C. ) he was attacked on