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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 50 50 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 9 9 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 6 6 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 5 5 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 43-45 (ed. Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.). You can also browse the collection for 189 BC or search for 189 BC in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 5 document sections:

Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 38 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.), chapter 30 (search)
aving arranged matters in Cephallania and stationed a garrison at Same, crossed to the Peloponnesus, whither the Aegians especially and the Lacedaemonians had long been summoning him. From the beginning of the Achaean League the meetings of the assembly had all been called for Aegium, whether this was a tribute to the importance of the city or the convenience of the place. This custom Philopoemen, in this year for the first time, was trying to break down, and was preparing to propose a law that the meetings should be held in all the cities which belonged to the Achaean League in rotation. And at the approach of the consul, when the damiurgi of the cities (they are the chief magistrates)Cf. XXXII. xxii. 2 and the note. called the meeting at Aegium, Philopoemen —he was then praetorHis fifth term in this office began in the autumn of 189 B.C. Livy habitually uses the Latin word praetor for the chief magistrate of foreign states: cf.
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 38 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.), chapter 43 (search)
There was a feud between Marcus Fulvius and the consul Marcus Aemilius, and, in addition to everything else, Aemilius considered that it was due to the efforts of Marcus Fulvius that he himself had reached the consulship two years late.Fulvius had presided at the election of his own colleague in the peculiar election for 189 B.C. (XXXVII. xlvii. 7) and at the election for 188 B.C. (xxxv. 1 above), and on both occasions Aemilius was defeated. He had then some reason for blaming Fulvius particularly for his failures. However, the interval between his praetorship (191 B.C.) and his consulship was not unusually long for this period. Therefore, with a view to making Fulvius unpopular, he introduced to the senate ambassadors of the Ambraciots, previously coached as to their charges, who were to complain that, while they were at peace and had performed the orders of the previous consuls and were ready to render the same obedience to Marcus Fulvius, war had been declared on t
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.), chapter 36 (search)
and because he belonged to the party of Philopoemen, who was responsible for whatever had been done in Lacedaemon, replied thus: "It is more difficult for us, Appius Claudius, to speak in your presence than it was recently in Rome before the senate.He probably means the embassy reported in xxxiii. 7 above, although it is not recorded that Lycortas himself was a member of that embassy, and Livy has not mentioned any argument with the Lacedaemonians at that time. Lycortas was also at Rome in 189 B.C. (XXXVIII. xxxii. 5-10). For then our task was to answer the accusations of the Lacedaemonians: now we have been accused by you, before whom we must plead our cause. This disadvantage of situation we accept in the hope that you will listen in the spirit of a judge, laying aside the vehemence of a prosecutor with which you spoke a little while ago. I at any rate, when these complaints which were presented, both here previously before Quintus CaeciliusThere must have been uno
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.), chapter 40 (search)
When this election had been avoided by the wisdom and courage of the senate, another followed,Cf. the similar contest at the preceding election of 189 B.C. (XXXVII. lvii. 9 —lviii. 2). involving a greater contest, as it was both for a more important prize and participated in by more and more powerful men. The censorship was sought with the most intense rivalry by Lucius Valerius Flaccus,B.C. 184 Publius and Lucius Scipio, Gnaeus Manlius Volso and Lucius Furius Purpurio, patricians, as well as by the plebeians Marcus Porcius Cato, Marcus Fulvius Nobilior, Tiberius Sempronius Longus and Marcus Sempronius Tuditanus.All the candidates were ex-consuls, as usual. Publius Scipio is Nasica, Lucius Scipio was striving for rehabilitation after his trial, but the outcome of the election suggests that the glory of the Scipios had, at least for a time, departed. But among all the patricians and plebeians of the most illustrious houses, Marcus Porcius Cato stood out most conspicuou
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.), chapter 52 (search)
apparently Polybius (l.c.; cf. Nepos, l.c.), despite what Livy says here, puts the date a year later. Rutilius is nowhere else quoted by Livy. write, died this year. For my part, I agree neither with them nor with ValeriusAntias dated Scipio's death in 187 B.C.: XXXVIII. liii. 8. —not with them, because in the censorship of Marcus Porcius and Lucius Valerius I find that the princeps senatus chosen was the same Lucius Valerius who was censor, whereas in the two preceding lustraThe censors of 189 B.C. gave him this rank for the third time (XXXVIII. xxviii. 2 and the note). The choice of Valerius in 184 B.C. is not mentioned in the running account of the censorship (xliii. 5 —xliv. 9 above). Africanus had held this distinction, and while he lived, unless he had been expelled from the senate, a disgrace which no one has recorded, another princeps would not have been chosen in his stead.Livy thus concludes that Scipio was dead before the lectio by Cato and Flaccus. Their active term a