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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 50 50 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 9 9 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 6 6 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 5 5 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 43-45 (ed. Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.). You can also browse the collection for 189 BC or search for 189 BC in all documents.

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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 41 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.), chapter 7 (search)
order to render an account to the Roman people of the reason why he had gone from the province of Gaul, which he had obtained from the lot, over into Histria? When, they asked, had the senate decreed that war? When had the Roman people ordered that war? But, by Hercules, he will say that although the war was undertaken on his own initiative, it was conducted wisely and courageously.The criticism of Manlius is similar to that directed against his brother after the Galatian campaign of 189 B.C. (especially XXXVIII, xlv. —xlvi). On the contrary, they said, it was impossible to say whether it was undertaken more improperly or prosecuted more imprudently. Two outposts were surprised by the Histrians, a Roman camp captured, and all the infantry and cavalry in the camp slaughtered, the rest, unarmed and routed, the consul himself leading the way, had fled to the sea and the ships! As a private citizen Manlius would give account of his actions, since he had refused to do th
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 41 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.), chapter 8 (search)
who had wearied both censors and former consuls, and were at length given audience before the senate. The substance of their complaints was that large numbers of their citizens had been rated at Rome and had moved to Rome;For an attempt in 189 B.C. to correct the same situation, cf. XXXIX. iii. 4-6. but if this were allowed it would come to pass in a very few decades that there would be deserted towns and deserted farms which would be unable to furnish a single soldier.A.U.C. 577 is uncertain. Perhaps this ordinance was part of the original compact which governed the relations of Rome and the Latin League. From the fact that there is no reference to it in XXXIX. iii, it might be argued that the law had been passed since 189 B.C. granted to any persons among the allies of the Latin confederacy, who should leaveThe phrase stirpem ex sese has reference to natural, not adopted sons; the provision is an insurance against a decrease in the number of families in a community. i
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 41 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.), chapter 9 (search)
completed, the consuls drew for their provinces; Histria fell to Claudius, Sardinia to Sempronius. Then Gaius Claudius, with the authorization of the senate, proposed a law concerning the allies, and issued a proclamation to the effect that all allies of the Latin confederacy, in the event that they themselves or their ancestors had been registered among the allies of the Latin confederacy in the censorship of Marcus Claudius and Titus Quinctius or thereafter,They were censors in 189 B.C. (XXXVII. lviii. 2). should all return, each to his own state, before the Kalends of November. The investigation of those who should not have returned in this fashion was decreed to Lucius Mummius the praetor.In viii. 2 above Mummius was allotted Sardinia, but this province had later been transferred to Gracchus. To this law and proclamation of the consul a decree of the senate was added, that a dictator, consul, interrex, censor, or praetor, who was at the time in office or shou
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 41 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.), chapter 13 (search)
day of prayer was held on the actual spot,I.e., at the spot where the portent occurred, not in Rome. and in Campania the cow was consigned to maintenance at the expense of the state. Atonement was made for the prodigy at Syracuse, the gods to whom supplication should beB.C. 177 made having been announced by the haruspices. That year occurred the death of the pontiff Marcus Claudius Marcellus, who had been consul and censor.He was consul in 196 B.C. (XXXIII, xxiv. 1) and censor in 189 B.C. (XXXVII. lviii. 2). In his place was substituted in the priesthood his son Marcus Marcellus. Also in that year a colony of two thousand Roman citizens was established at Luna. The board of three which established it consisted of Publius Aelius, Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, Gnaeus Sicinius; the allotment to each colonist was fifty-one and one half iugera. The land had been taken from the Ligurians; it had belonged to the Etruscans before the Ligurians. Gaius Claudius the consul came t