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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 50 50 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 9 9 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 6 6 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 5 5 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 43-45 (ed. Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 189 BC or search for 189 BC in all documents.

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Albi'nus 12. Sp. Postumius Albinus, L. F. A. N., was praetor peregrinus in B. C. 189 (Liv. 37.47, 50), and consul in 186. In his consulship the senatusconsultum was passed, which is still extant, suppressing the worship of Bacchus in Rome, in consequence of the abominable crimes which were committed in connexion with it. (39.6, 11, &c.; V. Max. 6.3.7; Plin. Nat. 33.10; Dict. of Ant. p. 344.) He was also augur, and died in 179 at an advanced age. (Liv 40.42; Cic. Cato, 3.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Alexander or Alexander Isius (search)
ce with Philip was discussed. Alexander dissuaded his friends from any peaceful arrangement with Philip. (Plb. 18.19, &c.; Appian, Maced. 7.1.) In B. C. 195, when a congress of all the Greek states that were allied with Rome was convoked by T. Quinctius Flamininus at Corinth, for the purpose of considering the war that was to be undertaken against Nabis, Alexander spoke against the Athenians, and also insinuated that the Romans were acting fraudulently towards Greece. (Liv. 34.23.) When in B. C. 189 M. Fulvius Nobilior, after his victory over Antiochus, was expected to march into Aetolia, the Aetolians sent envoys to Athens and Rhodes; and Alexander Isius, together with Phaneas and Lycopus, were sent to Rome to sue for peace. Alexander, now an old man, was at the head of the embassy; but he and his colleagues were made prisoners in Cephalenia by the Epeirots, for the purpose of extorting a heavy ransom. Alexander, however, although he was very wealthy, refused to pay it, and was accor
as allowed to retain all the fortresses which he had taken from Philip. In the war which the Romans, supported by Philip, waged with Antiochus III. Amynander was induced by his brother-in-law, Philip of Megalopolis, to side with Antiochus, to whom he rendered active service. But in B. C. 191 he was driven from his kingdom by Philip, and filed with his wife and children to Ambracia. The Romans required that he should be delivered up, but their demand was not complied with, and with the assistance of the Aetolians he recovered his kingdom. He sent ambassadors to Rome and to the Scipios in Asia, to treat for peace, which was granted him. (B. C. 189.) He afterwards induced the Ambrraciots to surrender to the Romans. He married Apamia, the daughter of a Megalopolitan named Alexander. Respecting his death we have no accounts. (Liv. 27.30, 29.12, 31.28, 32.14, 33.3, 34, 35.47, 36.7-10, 14, 28, 32, 38.1, 3, 9; Plb. 16.27, 17.1, 10, 18.19, 30, 20.10, 22.8, 12 ; Appian, App. Syr. 17.) [C.P.M]
who succeeded him, Attalus, Philetaerus, and Athenaeus. Attalus Ii. Surnamed PHILADELPHUS, was the second son of Attalus I., and was born in B. C. 200. (Lucian, Macrob. 12; Strab. xiii. p.624.) Before his accession to the crown, we frequently find him employed by his brother Eumenes in military operations. In B. C. 190, during the absence of Eumenes, he resisted an invasion of Seleucus, the son of Antiochus, and was afterwards present at the battle of Mount Sipylus. (Liv. 37.18, 43.) In B. C. 189, he accompanied the consul Cn. Manlius Vulso in his expedition into Galatia. (Liv. 38.12; Plb. 22.22.) In 182, he served his brother in his war with Pharnaces. (Plb. 25.4, 6.) In 171, with Eumenes and Athenaeus, he joined the consul P. Licinius Crassus in Greece. (Liv. 42.55, 58, 65.) He was several times sent to Rome as ambassador: in B. C. 192, to announce that Antiochus had crossed the Hellespont (Liv. 35.23); in 181, during the war between Eumenes and Pharnaces (Plb. 25.6); in 167, to
Attalus Ii. Surnamed PHILADELPHUS, was the second son of Attalus I., and was born in B. C. 200. (Lucian, Macrob. 12; Strab. xiii. p.624.) Before his accession to the crown, we frequently find him employed by his brother Eumenes in military operations. In B. C. 190, during the absence of Eumenes, he resisted an invasion of Seleucus, the son of Antiochus, and was afterwards present at the battle of Mount Sipylus. (Liv. 37.18, 43.) In B. C. 189, he accompanied the consul Cn. Manlius Vulso in his expedition into Galatia. (Liv. 38.12; Plb. 22.22.) In 182, he served his brother in his war with Pharnaces. (Plb. 25.4, 6.) In 171, with Eumenes and Athenaeus, he joined the consul P. Licinius Crassus in Greece. (Liv. 42.55, 58, 65.) He was several times sent to Rome as ambassador: in B. C. 192, to announce that Antiochus had crossed the Hellespont (Liv. 35.23); in 181, during the war between Eumenes and Pharnaces (Plb. 25.6); in 167, to congratulate the Romans on their victory over Perseus. Eum
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or Cato the Censor (search)
ved together under Glabrio, or that the words " cum Scipione," as some critics have thought, are an interpolation. In B. C. 189, M. Fulvius Nobilior, the consul, obtained Aetolia as his province, and Cato was sent thither after him, as we learn frtive and leading citizen. If Cato were in B. C. 190 with L. Scipio Asiaticus (as Cicero seems to have imagined), and in B. C. 189 in Aetolia with Fulvius, he must still have passed a portion of those years in Rome. We find him in B. C. 190 most stre to shews that, after his return from Aetolia in 189, he had to defend his own conduct against Thermus, who was tribune B. C. 189, and died in battle, B. C. 188. In B. C. 189, Cato and his old friend L. Valerius Flaccus were among the candidates fB. C. 189, Cato and his old friend L. Valerius Flaccus were among the candidates for the censorship, and, among their competitors, was their former general M'. Acilius Glabrio. Glabrio, who did not possess the advantage of nobility, determined to try what the influence of money could effect. In order to counteract his endeavours,
Chioma'ra (*Xioma/ra), wife of Ortiagon, king of Galatia, was taken prisoner by the Romans when Cn. Manlius Vulso invaded Galatia, B. C. 189, and was violated by the centurion into whose hands she fell. She agreed, however, to pay him a large sum for her ransom; and when he had delivered her up to a body of her countrymen who met them at an appointed place for the purpose, she caused him to be put to death, and carried back his head to her husband. (Plb. 22.21, and apud Plut. de Mul. Virt. p. 225, ed. Tauchn.; V. Max. 6.1. Extern. 2; comp. Liv. 38.12.) Polybiius says (l.c.), that he had himself conversed with her at Sardis, and admired her high spirit and good sense. [E.
Clau'dius 21. P. Claudius App. F. P. N. PULCHER, son of No. 17. In B. C. 189 he was curule aedile, and in 188 praetor. (Liv. 38.35.) In 184 he was made consul [see No. 20] (39.32), and in 181 one of the three commissioners appointed for planting a colony at Graviscae. (40.29.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Cotta, Aure'lius 4. M. Aurelius Cotta, was legate of L. Cornelius Scipio, in B. C. 189, during the war against Antiochus. He returned to Rome with the ambassadors of Antiochus, with Eumenes and the Rhodians, to report to the senate the state of affairs in the East. (Liv. 37.52.)
Damis 2. An Athenian, son of Icesias, was sent by his countrymen to intercede with the Romans on behalf of the Aetolians, B. C. 189, and is said to have been very instrumental, through his eloquence, in obtaining peace for the latter. (Plb. 22.14.) He is called Leon by Livy (38.10; comp. 35.50.)
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