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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 66 66 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 8 8 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 5 5 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 43-45 (ed. Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University). You can also browse the collection for 190 BC or search for 190 BC in all documents.

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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 29 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 12 (search)
with Rome in the Illyrian War of 219 B.C., but now subject to Philip. should be annexed to Macedonia, if the king, sending ambassadors to Rome, should obtain the senate's consent. Peace being agreed upon on these terms, Prusias, King of Bithynia, the Achaeans, Boeotians,B.C. 205 Thessalians, Acarnanians and Epirotes were included on the king's side of the treaty; on the side of the Romans, the Ilians,As progenitors of the Romans. Cf. their statement when Lucius Scipio visited Ilium in 190 B.C.; XXXVII. xxxvii. 1 ff.; cf. XXXVIII. xxxix. 10; Herodian I. 11. 3. Early evidence for the Aeneas legend. King Attalus, Pleuratus,A king of the Thracians; XXVI. xxiv. 9; XXVII. xxx. 13; XXVIII. v. 7. Nabis, tyrant of the Lacedaemonians,From 207 to 192 B.C. Successor of Machanidas, who fell in battle three years before this; Polybius XI. xviii. Frequently mentioned by Livy in subsequent books; his death XXXV. xxxv. 19. also the Eleans, Messenians and Athenians. These provisions were red
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 29 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 25 (search)
er for men and beasts for just as many days as they had grain. When they replied that there was water for forty-five days on board, he thereupon gave orders to the soldiers to remain quiet and ensure silence in proper obedience to the seamen and without interference, that these might perform their duties. With twenty warships, he said, he and Lucius ScipioHe had been with his older brother in Spain (XXVIII. iii. 2 ff.; iv. 2 ff.; xvii. 1) and in Sicily (above, vii. 2); consul in 190 B.C. with Laelius; XXXVI. xlv. 9. on the right wing would protect the transports; on the left wing the same number of war-ships and Gaius Laelius, admiral of the fleet, with Marcus Porcius Cato, who was at that time quaestor;His quaestorship in this year is attested by Cicero Cat. Mai. 10; Brutus 60; not in 205 B.C., as Nepos Cato i. 3. Plutarch has him return in protest from Sicily to Rome, iii. 7. that war-ships should have one lantern for each ship, transports two for each; that on the flagsh
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 38 (search)
than to Rome, and in case any envoys should come to Carthage they were not to let them go until they informed the Roman commander who they were and for what purpose they had come. With the CarthaginianB.C. 202 envoys Lucius Veturius Philo and Marcus Marcius Ralla and Lucius Scipio, brother of the general-in-command, were sent to Rome.Veturius had been consul in 206 B.C.(XXVIII. x.); Marcius, city praetor in 204 B.C. (XXIX. xiii. 2). Lucius Scipio reached the consulship with Laelius in 190 B.C. (XXXVII. i.). About that time supplies from Sicily and Sardinia lowered the price of grain so much that the merchant would leave his grain to the mariners to cover the freight. At Rome upon the first news of the Carthaginians' renewed hostilities there had been alarm, and Tiberius Claudius had been ordered to take his fleet promptly to Sicily and then to cross to Africa, and the other consul, Marcus Servilius, to remain near the city until it should be known what was the state of