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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 30 30 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 6 6 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 4 4 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 4 4 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 26-27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.). You can also browse the collection for 191 BC or search for 191 BC in all documents.

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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 41 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.), chapter 22 (search)
Carthage to Macedonia, and the Carthaginians had denied this without very much firmness. The senate decreed that ambassadors should also be sent to Macedonia. Three were dispatched, Gaius Laelius, Marcus Valerius Messalla, and Sextus Digitius. PerseusLivy here turns to affairs in the east and follows Polybius as his source. about this time, because certain of the DolopiansThe Dolopians had been liberated in 196 B.C. (XXXIII. xxxiv. 6), reconquered by Philip with Roman consent in 191 B.C. (XXXVI. xxxiii. 7), while their status after the settlement of 185 B.C. (XXXIX. xxvi. 14) was somewhat uncertain. Perseus obviously claimed some sort of authority over them, and from XLII. xli. 14 it would seem that their disobedience amounted to actual revolt. In 185 B.C. Rome had ordered Philip to stay inside the ancient boundaries of Macedonia, and the conduct of Perseus now is in fact, if not literally, a defiance of Rome. were insubordinate and wanted to refer the arbitration of the ma
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.), chapter 34 (search)
der Flamininus, who returned at the same time that Cato came back from Spain. No one, of all the generals now living, was a keener observer and judge of bravery, as those know who have had experience of him and other leaders, too, through long service. This general judged me worthy to be assigned as centurion of the forward first century of the advance formation. For the third time I enlisted, again voluntarily, in the army which was sent against the Aetolians and King Antiochus.191 B.C., cf. XXXVI. i. ff. By Manius Acilius I was given the rank of centurion of the forward first century of the main formation. When King Antiochus had been driven out and the Aetolians beaten, we were brought back to Italy; and twice after that I was in campaigns where the legionsB.C. 171 served for a year. Then I campaigned twice in Spain, once when Quintus Fulvius Flaccus was praetor,181 B.C., cf. XL. i. 1, xvi. 7-10, xxx —xxxiii, xxxvi. 10-11 and xxxix —xl. and again when Tiberius Semp