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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 41 41 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 6 6 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 5 5 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 5 5 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh). You can also browse the collection for 192 BC or search for 192 BC in all documents.

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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 35 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 44 (search)
, silence being with difficulty obtained, the king was introduced by Phaeneas the praetor and the other chiefs and began to speak. The opening of his speech was an apology because he had come with forces so much smaller than everyone had hoped and expected. This, he said, should be the best proof of the goodwill which he felt for them, because, although not fully prepared in any respect and at a premature timeThe phrase indicates that Antiochus crossed the Aegean in the fall (of 192 B.C.), after the storms had begun, instead of waiting for the next spring. for sailing, at the summons of their ambassadors he had obeyed without objection and had believed that when the Aetolians saw him they would consider that all their hope of safety depended on himself alone. But the hopes, even of those whose expectations seemed disappointed for the moment, he would realize to the full: for as soon as the early season of the year made the sea navigable he would fill all Greece