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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 35 35 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 43-45 (ed. Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 43-45 (ed. Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 26-27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 21-22 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Polybius, Histories, book 19, Summary Based on Livy (search)
to Flamininus. The latter summons a conference of Greek states at Corinth, and a war is decreed against Nabis, the Aetolians still expressing their dislike of Roman interference. The levies are collected; Argos is freed from Nabis; Sparta all but taken; and Nabis forced to submit to most humiliating terms: the Aetolians again objecting to his being allowed to remain at Sparta on any terms at all. In this year also legates from Antiochus visit Flamininus, but are referred to the Senate. B. C. 194: Publius Cornelius Scipio II., Tiberius Sempronius Longus, Coss. Flamininus leaves Greece after a speech at Corinth to the assembled league advising internal peace and loyalty to Rome, and enters Rome in triumph. There is a time of comparative tranquillity in Greece. B. C. 193: L. Cornelius Merula, Q. Minucius Thermus, Coss. The legates from Antiochus are sent back with the final answer that, unless the king abstains from entering Europe in arms, the Romans will free the Asiatic Greek cit
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.), BOOK VI., CHAPTER I. (search)
Hist. Anim. ii. 36. for which reason they keep their horses away from the river. The Crati turns the hair of those who bathe in it yellow, and sometimes white, but has been found salutary for the cure of many disorders. Thurii, after having flourished for a long time, became a continual prey to the aggressions of the Leucani,From B. C. 390 to 290. and afterwards the Tarentini troubling them, they appealed to the Romans for succour, who, in course of time, sent a colonyAbout B. C. 194. when it was nearly deserted, and changed the name of the city to Copiæ.Cæsar however calls it Thurii, and designates it a municipal town. Civ. Bell. iii. 22. After Thurii is Lagaria,Now La Nucara. a garrison fort; it was originally settled by EpeiusIt is not ascertained whether this leader were the architect of the Horse of Troy. and the Phocenses; hence is derived the Lagaritan wine, sweet and delicate, and much recommended by the physicians, as is likewise the Thurian wine, which is
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK XIV. THE NATURAL HISTORY OF THE FRUIT TREES., CHAP. 5. (4.)—REMARKABLE FACTS CONNECTED WITH THE CULTURE OF THE VINE. (search)
CHAP. 5. (4.)—REMARKABLE FACTS CONNECTED WITH THE CULTURE OF THE VINE. The elder Cato, who was rendered more particularly illustrious by his triumphIn B.C. 194, for his successes in Spain. and the censorship, and even more so by his literary fame, and the precepts which he has given to the Roman people upon every subject of utility, and the proper methods of cultivation in particular; a man who, by the universal confession, was the first husbandman of his age and without a rival-has mentioned a few varieties only of the vine, the very names of some of which are by this utterly forgotten.Mode of culture, locality, climate, and other extraneous circumstances, work, no doubt, an entire change in the nature of the vine. His statement on this subject deserves our separate consideration, and requires to be quoted at length, in order that we may make ourselves acquainted with the different varieties of this tree that were held in the highest esteem in the year of the City of Rome 600, abou
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 22 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.), chapter 61 (search)
d shown from of old the scantiest consideration for prisoners of war, they were also moved by the greatness of the sum required, not wishing either to exhaust the treasury, on which they had already made a heavy draft to purchase slaves and arm them for service, or to furnish Hannibal with moneyBut the senate could not keep Hannibal from making money out of his prisoners. When the senate would not ransom them, he sold them into slavery, and Polybius (see Livy XXXIV. 1. 6) told how, in 194 B.C., at the request of Flamininus, the Greek states bought up and liberated a great number of Roman prisoners who had been purchased from Hannibal. No less than twelve hundred were freed by the Achaeans alone, at a cost to their state of one hundred talents. Valerius Maximus (v. ii. 6), puts the whole number at two thousand, and doubtless thousands more had died in the course of twenty-two years. —the one thing of which he was rumoured to stand most in need. When the stern reply, that the
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 11 (search)
hat notoriety applied. From all of those who, as horsemen belonging to the legions from Cannae, were in Sicily —and there were many of them —their horses were taken away. To this severity the censors added also prolonged service —that the years previously served with horses furnished by the state should not be reckoned, but that they must serve ten years, furnishing their own mounts. Furthermore they sought out a great number of the men who were bound to serve in the cavalry, and reduced to the grade of aerariiXXII. liii. 5; XXIV. xliii. 2 f. and note. all those who at the beginning of the war had been seventeen years old and had not served. They then contracted for the rebuilding of what had been destroyed by fire around the Forum, namely, seven shops, the market, the Atrium Regium.See XXVI. xxvii. 2 f. and notes. Of the shops there mentioned as destroyed the so-called novae (north side of the Forum) were apparently not rebuilt until 194 B.C.; XXXV.
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 29 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 22 (search)
populace. He died, however, in prison before his trial in the assembly of the people could be completed. Clodius LicinusA younger contemporary of Livy, consul suffectus in A.D. 4. His history must have begun with the end of the Second Punic War. Cf. Suet. de Gram. 20. Rare in Livy is so precise a reference to any authority. in the third book of his Roman History relates of this Pleminius that during the votive games which Africanus was conducting at Rome in his second consulship,194 B.C.; XXXIV. xliv. 6 if., the same story under a different date and with omission of the source. he made an attempt, with the aid of certain men whom he had bribed, to set fire to the city in a number of places, in order to have a chance to break out of prison and escape; that then, when his crime was revealed, he wasB.C. 204 consigned to the TullianumThe older underground chamber beneath the Carcer. Mere mention of it implies that Pleminius was executed there, as is explicitly stated l.c.
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 29 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 36 (search)
us Licinius, the proconsul, urging him to bring up his legions, he united their forces. Thus two generals and two armies once more confronted Hannibal, and there was no delay in engaging, since doubled forces emboldened the consul, as his recent victory did the Carthaginian. Sempronius led his legions into the first line, while Publius Licinius' legions were posted in reserve. At the beginning of the battle the consul vowed a temple to Fortuna Primigenia,The temple, dedicated in 194 B.C., stood on the Quirinal inside the Porta Collina; cf. XXXIV. liii. 5 f. The worship of this goddess came from Praeneste (Palestrina). She was so named as Jupiter's first-born daughter. if he should rout the enemy that day; and he had his wish. The Carthaginians were routed and put to flight. Over four thousand armed men were slain, a little less than three hundred were captured alive, and forty horses and eleven military standards taken. Discouraged by defeat, Hannibal led his army bac
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 31 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 9 (search)
uthor, he was nevertheless directed to appeal to the collegeThe pontiffs as a body had final jurisdiction as interpreters of the ius divinum, or body of ordinances controlling the relations of men to gods. of priests, to learn whether a vow for an indeterminate sum could properly be undertaken. The pontiffs replied that it was possible and even more correct. The consul, at the dictation of the pontifex maximus, recited his vow in the language formerly used in connection with the quinquennial games,When the ludi Romani (cf. the note on iv. 5 above) became annual, special attention was devoted to those occurring every fifth year. with the exception that he promised games and a gift of an amount to be determined by the senate at the time the vow was paid.These games were held in 194 B.C.: cf. XXXIV. xliv. 6. The great games had been vowed eight times before for definite sums; this was the first vow for an indefinite amount.These statements cannot be verified.
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 35 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 10 (search)
). these were the patricians; the plebeians now were Gaius Laelius,Laelius was the most intimate friend of Scipio Africanus. He had entered politics late and had been praetor in 196 B.C. (XXXIII. xxiv. 2). Gnaeus Domitius,He was praetor in 194 B.C. (XXXIV. xlii. 4). Gaius Livius Salinator,Probably, but not certainly, the man mentioned in v. 8 above. and Manius Acilius.He had been plebeian aedile in 197 B.C. (XXXIII. xxv. 2). The circumstantial quality of Livy's details increases our confiden for about ten years constantly in the public eye, a fact which renders prominent men less venerated from sheer surfeit of seeing them: he had been consul for the second time after the defeat of Hannibal and censor;His second consulship was in 194 B.C., his censorship in 198 B.C. in the case of Quinctius, everything was new and fresh for winning favour; he had neither asked anything from the people since his triumph nor obtained anything. He said that he was campaigning for a real brothe
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 35 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 12 (search)
(dominus). Greece had been liberated by the Romans. and that neither PhilipPhilip was represented by the Aetolians as resentful at his defeat. nor NabisNabis was tyrant or king, according to the point of view, of Sparta. would remain quiet. When they saw that no movement was being made, thinking that some agitation and confusion should be caused, lest their scheming should become feeble from lack of exercise, they called a council at Naupactus.This council was held late in the fall of 194 B.C. or during the following winter, and Livy is gathering up and summarizing earlier events, preparatory to continuing the narrative. There Thoas, their chief magistrate, complained of the injuries inflicted by the Romans and of the condition of Aetolia, because of all the states and cities of Greece they were the least honoured, after that victory for which they themselves had been the chief cause, and proposed thatB.C. 193 ambassadors should be sent around to the kings, who should
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