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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 41 41 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 7 7 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 6 6 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 43-45 (ed. Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh). You can also browse the collection for 196 BC or search for 196 BC in all documents.

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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 35 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 5 (search)
At about the second hour the battle began. The left squadronCf. XXXI. xxi. 7; the dextra ala in this case was apparently with the Roman legions: see sect. 6 below. of the allies and the irregular troopsThese troops were not an organic part of the legion: cf. XXXIV. xlvii. 4 and the note. were fighting in the front line; their commanders were two lieutenants of consular rank, Marcus MarcellusProbably the consul of 196 B.C. (XXXIII. xxv. 4). and Tiberius Sempronius,Cf. XXXIV. xlii. 3. consul of the preceding year. The new consul was now with the leading standards, now holding back the legions in reserve, lest in their ardour for the fight theyB.C. 193 should rush forward before the signal was given. He ordered two military tribunes, Quintus and Publius Minucius, to lead the cavalry of these legions beyond the flanks of the battle-line into open ground, whence, when the signal was given, they were to attack from the open.The phrase ex aperto does not repeat the idea of i
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 35 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 10 (search)
der. Publius CorneliusB.C. 193 Scipio, the son of Gnaeus, who had recently returned from Spain after performing great deeds,Cf. i. 3 ff. above. and Lucius Quinctius Flamininus, who had commanded the fleet in Greece,Cf. XXXII. xvi. 9, etc. and Gnaeus Manlius Volso;He had been praetor in 195 B.C. (XXXIII. xlii. 7). these were the patricians; the plebeians now were Gaius Laelius,Laelius was the most intimate friend of Scipio Africanus. He had entered politics late and had been praetor in 196 B.C. (XXXIII. xxiv. 2). Gnaeus Domitius,He was praetor in 194 B.C. (XXXIV. xlii. 4). Gaius Livius Salinator,Probably, but not certainly, the man mentioned in v. 8 above. and Manius Acilius.He had been plebeian aedile in 197 B.C. (XXXIII. xxv. 2). The circumstantial quality of Livy's details increases our confidence in his accuracy in the account of the campaign. But the eyes of all men were turned upon Quinctius and Cornelius; for both were patricians, contending for one place, and recentl