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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 41 41 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 7 7 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 6 6 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 43-45 (ed. Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.). You can also browse the collection for 196 BC or search for 196 BC in all documents.

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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 41 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.), chapter 13 (search)
In the territory of Crustumerium a day of prayer was held on the actual spot,I.e., at the spot where the portent occurred, not in Rome. and in Campania the cow was consigned to maintenance at the expense of the state. Atonement was made for the prodigy at Syracuse, the gods to whom supplication should beB.C. 177 made having been announced by the haruspices. That year occurred the death of the pontiff Marcus Claudius Marcellus, who had been consul and censor.He was consul in 196 B.C. (XXXIII, xxiv. 1) and censor in 189 B.C. (XXXVII. lviii. 2). In his place was substituted in the priesthood his son Marcus Marcellus. Also in that year a colony of two thousand Roman citizens was established at Luna. The board of three which established it consisted of Publius Aelius, Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, Gnaeus Sicinius; the allotment to each colonist was fifty-one and one half iugera. The land had been taken from the Ligurians; it had belonged to the Etruscans before the Liguria
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 41 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.), chapter 22 (search)
culapius. The king, moreover, had asserted that envoys had been sent from Carthage to Macedonia, and the Carthaginians had denied this without very much firmness. The senate decreed that ambassadors should also be sent to Macedonia. Three were dispatched, Gaius Laelius, Marcus Valerius Messalla, and Sextus Digitius. PerseusLivy here turns to affairs in the east and follows Polybius as his source. about this time, because certain of the DolopiansThe Dolopians had been liberated in 196 B.C. (XXXIII. xxxiv. 6), reconquered by Philip with Roman consent in 191 B.C. (XXXVI. xxxiii. 7), while their status after the settlement of 185 B.C. (XXXIX. xxvi. 14) was somewhat uncertain. Perseus obviously claimed some sort of authority over them, and from XLII. xli. 14 it would seem that their disobedience amounted to actual revolt. In 185 B.C. Rome had ordered Philip to stay inside the ancient boundaries of Macedonia, and the conduct of Perseus now is in fact, if not literally, a defiance
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.), chapter 38 (search)
and were heard with great and universal approval;The leaders of Epirus belonged to the wisest class who favoured a balance of power, and neutrality, as nearly as might be inoffensive to Rome, in the war. The story of how this policy was disturbed by intrigues of Charops, a young man on the make, is told by Polybius (XXVII. 15) but not by Livy. and they sent four hundred native young men to the OrestansA tribe on the border of Macedonia and Epirus; they were made independent of Macedonia in 196 B.C., cf. XXXIII. xxxiv. 6. to be a guard for those who had been freed from the Macedonians. Thence the Romans proceeded to Aetolia, and, after a stay of a few days there, while a general was being elected in place of the one who had died, upon the election of Lyciscus,Polybius XXXII. 4, does not give this leader a good character; cf. Livy XLV. xxviii. 7. who, it was quite certain, favoured the Roman side, the envoys crossed to Thessaly. There Acarnanian envoys and Boeotian exiles came to