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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 54 54 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 6 6 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 5 5 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 4 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 3 3 Browse Search
Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Antigone 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 2 2 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Oedipus at Colonus 1 1 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Oedipus at Colonus. You can also browse the collection for 200 BC or search for 200 BC in all documents.

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Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Oedipus at Colonus, section 18 (search)
could be made into a pair of comic trimeters, e.g. ei) me\n *sofokle/hs ei)mi/, parafronoi=m' a)\n ou)/: ei) d' au)= parafronw=, *sofokle/hs ou)k ei)/m' e)gw/. This would fit into a burlesque forensic speech, in the style of the new rhetoric, which the comedy may have put into the mouth of Sophocles. As though, in a modern comedy, the pedagogue should say,—"If I am Doctor X., I am not fallible; if I am fallible, I am not Doctor X.". The words are quoted in the anonymous Life of Sophocles as being recorded by Satyrus, a Peripatetic who lived about 200 B.C., and left a collection of biographies. His work appears to have been of a superficial character, and uncriticalThe literary vestiges of this Satyrus will be found in Müller, Fragm. Hist. III. 159 ff.. The incident of the trial, as he found it in a comedy of the time of Sophocles, would doubtless have found easy acceptance at his hands. From Satyrus, directly or indirectly, the story was probably derived by Cicero and later writer