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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 42 42 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 5 5 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 4 4 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 4 4 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University). You can also browse the collection for 204 BC or search for 204 BC in all documents.

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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 28 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 45 (search)
The consul begged for one day to confer with his colleague; on the next day he gave the senate his permission. The provinces were assigned by decree as follows: to one of the consuls Sicily and the thirty war-shipsA small fleet in comparison with the hundred ships assigned to Sicily in 208 B.C.; XXVII. xxii. 9. For an invasion a much larger navy would seem to be required. Add the 30 new ships presently to be built (§ 21). But actually only 40 war-ships escorted 400 transports in 204 B.C.; XXIX. xxvi. 3. which Gius Servilius had commanded in the previous year;Cf. x. 16. and permission to cross over to Africa was given, if he should consider that to be to the advantage of the state; to the other consul the land of the Bruttians and the war with Hannibal, together with the army which he preferred.I.e. of the two in that region; cf. x. 10; xi. 12; xlvi. 2. Lucius Veturius and Quintus Caecilius were to decide between them by lot or by arrangement which of them was to wage
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 29 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 14 (search)
nd woman, Dion. Hal. II. xix. 4 f. Romans were excluded by a decree of the senate, but the restriction was later removed (2nd century A.D.). Cf. XXXVII. ix. 9; XXXVIII. xviii. 9. and carried her to land. The foremost matrons in the state, among whom the name of one in particular, that of Claudia Quinta,Her statue was later placed in the temple of the Magna Mater dedicated in 191 B.C., the consulship of Nasica. Cf. XXXVI. xxxvi. 3 f.; Tacitus Ann. IV. 64; Val. Max. I. viii. 11. Between 204 B.C. and 191 the black stone remained in the Temple of Victory, § 14 is conspicuous, received her. Claudia's repute, previously not unquestioned, as tradition reports it, has made her purity the more celebrated among posterity by a service so devout. The matrons passed the goddess from hand to hand in an unbroken succession to each other, while the entire city poured out to meet her. Censers had been placed before the doors along the route of the bearers, and kindling their incense, people
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 29 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 28 (search)
columns of women and children, had filled all the roads in every direction, but cattle also driven before them by the farmers, so that one would have said Africa was suddenly being deserted. But even in the cities they inspired greater alarm than that which they had brought with them. Especially at Carthage the uproar was almost like that of a captured city. For since the consulship of Marcus Atilius Regulus and Lucius Manlius, for almost fifty yearsIn reality just 52 years (256-204 B.C.); cf. xxvi. 2, note. they had seen no Roman forces except only predatory fleets, by means of which descents had been made on farms near the sea; and seizing whatever chance had put in their way, the men had always raced back to their ships before the outcry should arouse the farmers. All the greater at this time was the flight and alarm in the city. They lacked also, to be sure, both a strong army at home and a general to confront the enemy. Hasdrubal the son of Gisgo was
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 2 (search)
r from Africa, Villius took with him thirteen new ships to Sicily, while the rest in Sicily were old ships repaired. Placed in charge of this fleet, with his command continued, was Marcus Pomponius, praetor in the preceding year, who provided the ships with new soldiers brought from Italy. The same number of ships were by decree of the senate assigned, with the same extension of his command, to Gnaeus Octavius, who likewise had been praetorOctavius was really propraetor in 204 B.C., having been praetor in 205; XXVIII. xxxviii. 11, 13; XXIX. xiii. 5. in the preceding year, in order to defend the coast of Sardinia. Lentulus, the praetor, was ordered to furnish two thousand soldiers for the ships. As for the defence of the coast of Italy, since it was not known to what point the Carthaginians would send their fleet —while they seemed likely to attack any part of it that was left unguarded —that task with the same number of ships was entrusted to Marcus Marcius, pra
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 23 (search)
that on account of their age they did not remember —nearly all of them being young men. Upon that there were shouts from every part of the house that Punic trickery had led them to choose men who did not themselves remember it, to ask that the old treaty should be revived. XXIII. Then after the envoys had been ushered out of the house,I.e. the temple serving as a curia for this occasion. opinions began to be called for. Marcus LiviusConsul in 219 and 207 B.C., and lately censor (204 B.C.). Fabius Maximus, princeps senatus, was probably ill, or had already died; xxvi. 7. moved that Gaius Servilius, the consul, being the nearer, should be summoned, in order that discussion of peace might be in his presence. Since there could be no more important subject for deliberation than that, it did not seem toB.C. 203 him, he said, that debate on the question in the absence of one or both of the consuls was quite in keeping with the dignity of the Roman people. Quintus Metellus, who had
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 38 (search)
were not to send envoys during the period of the armistice to any other place than to Rome, and in case any envoys should come to Carthage they were not to let them go until they informed the Roman commander who they were and for what purpose they had come. With the CarthaginianB.C. 202 envoys Lucius Veturius Philo and Marcus Marcius Ralla and Lucius Scipio, brother of the general-in-command, were sent to Rome.Veturius had been consul in 206 B.C.(XXVIII. x.); Marcius, city praetor in 204 B.C. (XXIX. xiii. 2). Lucius Scipio reached the consulship with Laelius in 190 B.C. (XXXVII. i.). About that time supplies from Sicily and Sardinia lowered the price of grain so much that the merchant would leave his grain to the mariners to cover the freight. At Rome upon the first news of the Carthaginians' renewed hostilities there had been alarm, and Tiberius Claudius had been ordered to take his fleet promptly to Sicily and then to cross to Africa, and the other consul, Marcus Se