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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 38 38 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 5 5 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 4 4 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 21-22 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
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Appian, Wars in Spain (ed. Horace White), CHAPTER VII (search)
d down with captives, money, arms, and all kinds of booty. The city gave him a glorious reception, bestowing noble and unprecedented honors upon him on account of his youth and the rapidity and greatness of his exploits. Even those who envied him acknowledged that his boastful promises of long ago were realized in facts. And so, admired by all, he was awarded the honor of a triumph. As soon as Scipio departed from Spain, Indibilis rebelled again. The generals in Spain, collecting together an army from the garrisons and such forces as they could obtain from the subject tribes, defeated and slew him. Those who were guilty of inciting the revolt were brought to trial, and punished B.C. 205 with loss of goods and death. The tribes that took sides with Indibilis were fined, deprived of their arms, required to give hostages, and placed under stronger garrisons. These things happened just after Scipio's departure. And so the first war undertaken by the Romans in Spain came to an end.
Appian, Hannibalic War (ed. Horace White), CHAPTER IX (search)
CHAPTER IX Scipio sails to Sicily -- A Sacred Image brought to Rome -- Hannibal's Troubles in Bruttium -- Hannibal recalled by Carthage -- Tries to take his Italian Soldiers thither -- Embarks for Africa -- Punishment of the Bruttians Y.R. 549 In Rome the consuls at this time were Licinius Crassus and Publius Scipio, the conqueror of Spain. Crassus conducted the war against Hannibal in Apulia, but B.C. 205 Scipio advised the people that they would never drive Hannibal and the Carthaginians out of Italy except by sending a Roman army into Africa and so bringing danger to their own doors. By persisting strenuously and persuading those who hesitated he was himself chosen general for Africa and sailed forthwith to Sicily. Having collected and drilled an army there he sailed suddenly to Locri in Italy which was garrisoned by Hannibal. Having slain the garrison and put the town under the command of Pleminius he embarked for Africa. Pleminius visited upon the Locri
Appian, Punic Wars (ed. Horace White), CHAPTER II (search)
t he was come by a B.C. 210 divine mission and had divine counsel in all things, prevailed brilliantly, and achieving great glory by this success, gave over his command to those sent to succeed him, returned to Rome, and asked to be sent with an army to Africa so as to draw Hannibal out of Italy and to bring retribution upon the Carthaginians in their own country. Some of the leading men opposed this plan, saying Y.R. 549 that it was not best to send an army into Africa while Italy B.C. 205 was wasted by such long wars and was subject to the ravages of Hannibal, and while Mago was enlisting Ligurian and Celtic mercenaries for a flank attack upon her. They ought not to attack another land, they said, until they had delivered their own country from its present perils. Others thought that the Carthaginians were emboldened to attack Italy because they were not molested at home, and that if war were brought to their own doors they would recall Hannibal. So it was decided to send Scip
Appian, Macedonian Affairs (ed. Horace White), Fragments (search)
ed, not long afterward, on their departure. Again the ambassadors assembled and said that it was very evident that Philip and the Ætolians, by their differences, were subjecting the Greeks to servitude to the Romans, because they were accustoming the latter to make frequent attempts upon Greece. When Sulpicius rose to reply to them the crowd would not hear him, but shouted that the ambassadors had told the truth. Y.R. 549 Finally the Ætolians took the initiative and made B.C. 205 peace with Philip by themselves without the Romans, and messengers were sent to Rome by Philip himself and by the commander of the Roman forces in order to come to an agreement. Peace was made between them on the condition that neither party should do any injury to the friends of the other. This was the result of the first trial of strength between them, and neither of them believed that the treaty would be lasting, since it was not based on good-will. FROM "THE EMBASSIES
Polybius, Histories, book 14, Preface (search)
ge, even to those who did not care to take part in public business. Therefore, as I wished to make my narrative worthy of its subject, I have not, as in former instances, included the history of two years in one book. . . . Elected Consul for B.C. 205 (see 11, 33) Scipio had Sicily assigned as his provincia, with leave to cross to Africa if necessary (Livy, 28, 45). He sent Laelius to Africa in B.C. 205, but remained himself in Sicily. Next spring (B.C. 204) he crossed to Africa with a year's d Consul for B.C. 205 (see 11, 33) Scipio had Sicily assigned as his provincia, with leave to cross to Africa if necessary (Livy, 28, 45). He sent Laelius to Africa in B.C. 205, but remained himself in Sicily. Next spring (B.C. 204) he crossed to Africa with a year's additional imperium. In the course of this year he ravaged the Carthaginian territory and besieged Utica (Livy, 29, 35), and at the beginning of B.C. 203 his imperium was prolonged till he should have finished the war (id. 30, 1).
Polybius, Histories, book 15, Ptolemy Epiphanes Succeeds To the Crown (search)
re of extraordinary cunning, who long retained his power, and was the instrument of many crimes at court: he contrived first the murder of Lysimachus, son of Arsinoe, daughter of Ptolemy and Berenice; secondly, that of Maga, son of Ptolemy and Berenice the daughter of Maga; thirdly, that of Berenice the mother of Ptolemy Philopator; fourthly, that of Cleomenes of Sparta; and fifthly, that of Arsinoe the daughter of Berenice. . . . Three or four days after the death of Ptolemy Philopator,B. C. 205. The death of Ptolemy Philopator announced, and Epiphanes crowned. having caused a platform to be erected in the largest court of the palace Agathocles and Sosibius summoned a meeting of the footguards and the household, as well as the officers of the infantry and cavalry. The assembly being formed, they mounted the platform, and first of all announced the deaths of the king and queen, and proclaimed the customary period of mourning for the people. After that they placed a diadem upon the hea
Polybius, Histories, book 18, The War with Philip (search)
nything happened to Phaeneas, there were many who would act as Strategi for the Aetolians; but if Philip were to perish at the present juncture, there was no one to be king of the Macedonians." Though all thought this an unconciliatory way of opening the discussion, Flamininus nevertheless bade him speak on the matters he had come to consider. The Roman demand. Philip however said that "The word was not with himself but with Flamininus; and therefore begged that he would state clearly what he was to do in order to have peace." The Roman consul replied that" What he had to say was simple and obvious: it was to bid him evacuate Greece entirely; restore the prisoners and deserters in his hands to their several states; hand over to the Romans those parts of Illyricum of which he had become possessed since the peace of Epirus; and, similarly, to restore to Ptolemy all the cities which he had taken from him since the death of Ptolemy Philopator. Peace of Epirus, B.C. 205. See supra 11, 5-7.
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 22 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.), chapter 25 (search)
that the master of the horse must answer to him for having fought against his orders. If his authority and strategy should be paramount, he would soon letB.C. 217 people know that with a good commander fortune was of little moment; that mind and reason were in control; and that to have preserved the army in its hour of danger, yet without disgrace,This is possibly a sneer at Scipio, who after the Trebia took refuge with his beaten army behind the walls of Placentia and Cremona. In 205 B.C., Fabius's distrust of the Scipios was to take the form of bitter opposition to the son's project for invading Africa (XXVIII. xl.-xliii. and xxIx. xix.). was more glorious than to have slain many thousands of the enemy. After making several speeches to this purport, yet without effect, and presiding over the election of Marcus Atilius RegulusHe had been consul before, in 227 B.C. to the consulship, that he might not take a personal part in the dispute about the command, on the day prec
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 22 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.), chapter 33 (search)
At about this time a Carthaginian spy who for two years had eluded capture was caught in Rome, and after his hands had been cut off, was allowed to go; and five and twenty slaves were crucified, on the charge of having conspired in the Campus Martius. The informer was rewarded withB.C. 217 freedom and twenty thousand sesterces. Ambassadors were dispatched to Philip,Philip V., with whom the Romans were to fight the first two Macedonian wars of 216-205 B.C. and 200-197 B.C. King of the Macedonians, to demand the person of Demetrius of Pharus,Demetrius of Pharus (an island off the coast of Illyria) had (in 229 B.C.) treacherously surrendered to the Romans the island Corcyra, of which the Illyrian queen Teuta had made him governor. Rewarded for this service with the governorship of a number of islands, he was guilty of plundering Roman allies, and Aemilius Paulus led an expedition against him which resulted (in 219) in his defeat and exile. who, beaten in war, had fled to
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 25 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 40 (search)
ry beginning of enthusiasm for Greek works of art and consequently of this general licence to despoil all kinds of buildings, sacred and profane, a licence which finally turned against Roman gods, and first of all against the very temple which was magnificently adorned by Marcellus. For temples dedicated by Marcus Marcellus near the Porta CapenaThe Temples of Honos and Virtus were outside the gate, on the Appian Way; XXVI. xxxii. 4; XXVII. xxv. 7-9; Plutarch, Marcellus 28. Dedicated in 205 B.C. by Marcellus' son; XXIX. xi. 13. In the Temple of Virtus stood the famous sphaera (orrery) of Archimedes; Cicero de Re Publica I. 21. used to be visited by foreigners on account of their remarkable adornments of that kind; but of these a very small part is still to be seen. Embassies from nearly all the states in Sicily kept coming to him. As their pleas were different, so was their status. Those who before the capture of Syracuse either had not rebelled or had returned to friendly rela
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