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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 38 38 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 5 5 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 4 4 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 21-22 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh). You can also browse the collection for 205 BC or search for 205 BC in all documents.

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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 35 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 8 (search)
e senate about his achievements and the condition in which his province was, he voiced a complaint to the Fathers because, after so great a war had been so successfully finished by a single victory, no honour had been paid to the immortal gods. He then demanded that they decree a thanksgiving and a triumph at the same time. Before, however, the formal motion was put, Quintus Metellus, who had been consul and dictator,Metellus was consul in 206 B.C. (XXVIII. x. 2) and dictator in 205 B.C. (XXIX. x. 2). said that letters had arrived at the same time, addressed both to the senate by Lucius Cornelius and to a great part of the senators by Marcus Marcellus, that these reports contradicted one another, and that a decision had been postponed for the reason that the debate might be held in the presence of the writers of these letters. He had accordingly assumed that the consul, who knew that something unfavourable to himself had been written by his subordinate, since he had h
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 36 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 31 (search)
all possible naval bases closed to foreign powers. Rome had occupied it in 211 B.C. (XXVI. xxiv. 15), but in some manner it had passed into Philip's possession. Livy relates its subsequent history in the following sections. For some reason Quinctius makes no mention of Rome's earlier interest. which had been wrongfully occupied, and demanded that it be restored to the Romans. Zacynthos had formerly belonged to Philip, king of the Macedonians; he had ceded it to Amynander as a bribe to induce him to permit Philip to lead his army through Athamania into the upper part of Aetolia, on the expeditionIn 207 B.C. (XXVIII. vii. 14) or 205 B.C. (XXIX. xii. 1). by which he had broken the spirits of the Aetolians and forced them to seek peace. Amynander had appointed Philip of Megalopolis governor of the island; later, during the war in which he joined Antiochus against the Romans, he had recalled Philip for military duties and sent Hierocles of Agrigentum to succeed him.
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 36 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 37 (search)
he selection of Scipio Nasica as the vir optimus to receive the goddess (e.g. XXXV. x. 9). The choice of Brutus rather than Nasica as the dedicator of the temple may be an additional rebuke to him. See, however, the Periocha. The contract for the construction of the temple, under a decree of the senate, was let by the censors Marcus Livius and Gaius Claudius in the consulship of Marcus Cornelius and Publius Sempronius;The chronology is incorrect. Africanus and Licinius were consuls in 205 B.C. (XXVIII. xxxviii. 12) and Cethegus and Tuditanus in 204 B.C. (XXIX. xi. 10), when the divinity was brought to Rome. Livius and Claudius were censors in this year (XXIX. xxxvii. 1). See also sect. 6 below. thirteen years after the contract was let, Marcus Junius Brutus dedicated the temple, and gamesB.C. 191 were given by reason of the dedication, which Valerius Antias says were the first to be held with dramatic performances, and called the Megalesia.It is futile to try to determine just wh