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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 38 38 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 5 5 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 4 4 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 21-22 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 23-25 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 205 BC or search for 205 BC in all documents.

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Agathocle'a (*)Agaqo/kleia), a mistress of the profligate Ptolemy Philopator, King of Egypt, and sister of his no less profligate minister Agathocles. She and her brother, who both exercised the most unbounded influence over the king, were introduced to him bv their ambitious and avaricious mother, Oenanthe. After Ptolemy had put to death his wife and sister Eurydice, Agathoclea became his favourite. On the death of Ptolemy (B. C. 205), Agathoclea and her friends kept the event secret, that they might have an opportunity of plundering the royal treasury. They also formed a conspiracy for setting Agathocles on the throne. He managed for some time, in conjunction with Sosibius, to act as guardian to the young king Ptolemy Epiphanes. At last the Egyptians and the Macedonians of Alexandria, exasperated at his outrages, rose against him, and Tlepolemus placed himself at their head. They surrounded the palace in the night, and forced their way in. Agathocles and his sister implored in the
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
ed into India, and renewed the alliance of the Syrian kings with that country; and he obtained from Sophagasenus, the chief of the Indian kings, a large supply of elephants. He at length returned to Syria after an absence of seven years (B. C. 212-205), which may be regarded as the most flourishing period of his reign. It appears that the title of Great was conferred upon him during this time. In the year that Antiochus returned to Syria (B. C. 205), Ptolemy Philopator died, leaving as his suB. C. 205), Ptolemy Philopator died, leaving as his successor Ptolemy Epiphanes, then a child of five years old. Availing himself of the weakness of the Egyptian government, Antiochus entered into an agreement with Philip, king of Macedonia, to divide between them the dominions of Ptolemy. As Philip became engaged soon afterwards in a war with the Romans, he was unable to send forces against Egypt; but Antiochus prosecuted this war vigorously in Palestine and Coele-Syria, and at length obtained complete possession of these provinces by his victory
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Apollo'nius or Apollo'nius Pergaeus (search)
Apollo'nius or Apollo'nius Pergaeus surnamed PERGAEUS,from Perga in Pamphylia, his native city, a mathematician educated at Alexandria under the successors of Euclid. He was born in the reign of Ptolemy Euergetes (Eutoc. Comm. in Ap. Con. lib. i.), and died under Philopator, who reigned B. C. 222-205. (Hephaest. apud Phot. cod. cxc.) He was, therefore, probably about 40 years younger than Archimedes. His geometrical works were held in such esteem, that they procured for him the appellation of the Great Geometer. (Eutoc. l.c.) He is also mentioned by Ptolemy as an astronomer, and is said to have been called by the sobriquet of e, from his fondness for observing the moon, the shape of which was supposed to resemble that letter. Works Conic Sections Apollonius' most important work, the only considerable one which has come down to our time, was a treatise on Conic Sections in eight books. Of these the first four, with the commentary of Eutocius, are extant in Greek; and all but the
stadia from Athens, is doubtless mentioned as a reproach. (See Stallbaum's note.) Aristotle, too, calls him a sophist (Metaphys. 2.2), and notices a story of Plato speaking to him with rather undue vehemence, and of his replying with calmness. (Rhet. 2.23.) He imparted his doctrine to his daughter Arete, by whom it was communicated to her son, the younger Aristippus (hence called *mhtrodi/daktos), and by him it is said to have been reduced to a system. Laertius, on the authority of Sotion (B. C. 205) and Panactius (B. C. 143), gives a long list of books whose authorship is ascribed to Aristippus, though he also says that Sosicrates of Rhodes (B. C. 255) states, that he wrote nothing. Among these are treatises *Peri\ *Paidei/as, *Peri\ *)Areth=s, *Peri\ *Tu/xhs, and many others. Some epistles attributed to him are deservedly rejected as forgeries by Bentley. (Dissertation on Phalaris, &c. p. 104.) One of these is to Arete, and its spuriousness is proved, among other arguments, by the
Aristo'menes 4. An Acarnanian, a friend and flatterer of the contemptible Agathocles, who for a time had the government of Egypt in the name of the young king Ptolemy V. (Euergetes.) During the administration of Agathocles Aristomenes was all-pow-erful, and when the insurrection against Agathocles broke out in B. C. 205, Aristomenes was the only one among his friends who ventured to go and try to pacify the rebellious Macedonians. But this attempt was useless, and Aristomenes himself narrowly escaped being murdered by the insurgents. After Agathocles was put to death, Tlepolemus, who had headed the insurrection, was appointed regent. But about B. C. 202, Aristomenes contrived to get the regency and distinguished himself now by the energy and wisdom of his administration no less than previously by his faithfulness to Agathocles. Scopas and Dicaearchus, two powerful men, who ventured to oppose his government, were put to death by his command. Towards the young king, Aristomenes was a f
.) In 209, he was made praetor of the Aetolians conjointly with Pyrrhias, and in the following year joined Sulpicius with a fleet. After wintering at Aegina, in 207 he overran Peparethus, assisted in the capture of Oreus, and took Opus. While engaged in collecting tribute in the neighbourhood of this town, he narrowly escaped falling into Philip's hands; and hearing that Prusias, king of Bithynia, had invaded Pergamus, he returned to Asia. (Liv. 27.29, 30, 33, 28.3-7; Plb. 10.41, 42.) In B. C. 205, in obedience to an injunction of the Sibylline books, the Romans sent an embassy to Asia to bring away the Idaean Mother from Pessinus in Phrygia. Attains received them graciously and assisted them in procuring the black stone which was the symbol of the goddess. (Liv. 29.10, 11.) At the general peace brought about in 204, Prusias and Attalus were included, the former as the ally of Philip, the latter as the ally of the Romans. (29.12.) On the breaking out of hostilities between Philip an
.) In 209, he was made praetor of the Aetolians conjointly with Pyrrhias, and in the following year joined Sulpicius with a fleet. After wintering at Aegina, in 207 he overran Peparethus, assisted in the capture of Oreus, and took Opus. While engaged in collecting tribute in the neighbourhood of this town, he narrowly escaped falling into Philip's hands; and hearing that Prusias, king of Bithynia, had invaded Pergamus, he returned to Asia. (Liv. 27.29, 30, 33, 28.3-7; Plb. 10.41, 42.) In B. C. 205, in obedience to an injunction of the Sibylline books, the Romans sent an embassy to Asia to bring away the Idaean Mother from Pessinus in Phrygia. Attains received them graciously and assisted them in procuring the black stone which was the symbol of the goddess. (Liv. 29.10, 11.) At the general peace brought about in 204, Prusias and Attalus were included, the former as the ally of Philip, the latter as the ally of the Romans. (29.12.) On the breaking out of hostilities between Philip an
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or Cato the Censor (search)
gmatism, coarseness, harshness, vanity, self-sufficiency, and prejudice,--if he had little sympathy with the pursuits of calm and contemplative scholars,--if he disdained or hated or disparaged the accomplishments which he had no leisure to master,--if he railed and rebelled against the conventional elegancies of a more polished society to which he and his party were opposed,--if he confounded delicacy of sentiment with unmanly weakness, and refinement of manners with luxurious vice ? In B. C. 205, Cato was designated quaestor, and in the following year entered upon the duties of his office, and followed P. Scipio Africanus to Sicily. When Scipio, acting on the permission which, after much opposition, he had obtained from the senate, transported the army from the island into Africa, Cato and C. Laelius were appointed to convoy the baggage-ships. There was not that cordiality of co-operation between Cato and Scipio which ought to subsist between a quaestor and his proconsul. Fabius h
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
anlius Torquatus, in a hard-fought contest for the office of pontifex maximus. (Liv. 25.5.) In B. C. 211 he was curule aedile, and gave splendid games, remarkable for the crowns with foliage of gold and silver, that were then first exhibited at Rome (Plin. Nat. 21.4); in B. C. 210 he was magister equitum of the dictator Q. Fulvius Flaccus, and in the same year obtained the censorship, but abdicated (as was usual) in consequence of the death of his colleague. In B. C. 208 he was praetor. In B. C. 205 he was consul with Scipio Africanus, and undertook the task of keeping Hannibal in check in the country of the Bruttii. Here he succeeded in rescuing some towns from the enemy, but was able to do little in consequence of a contagious disease which attacked him and his army. (Liv. 29.10.) In the following year he united his forces with those of the consul Sempronius, to oppose Hannibal in the neighbourhood of Croton, but the Romans were defeated. In B. C. 203, he returned to Rome, and died
Falto 3. M. Valerius Falto, one of the envoys sent by the senate, B. C. 205, to Attalus I. king of Pergamus. Their mission was to fetch the Idaean mother to Italy, according to an injunction of the Sibylline Books. Falto was of quaestorian rank at this time, but the date of his quaestorian is not known. On the return of the envoys to Rome Falto was sent forward to announce the message of the Delphic oracle, which they had consulted on their journey, to the senate--" The best man in the state must welcome the goddess or her representative on her landing." (Liv. 29.11.) Falto was one of the curule aediles, B. C. 203, when a supply of Spanish grain enabled those magistrates to sell corn to the poor at a sesterce the bushel. (30.26.) Falto was praetor B. C. 201. His province was Bruttium, and two legions were allotted to him. (30.40, 41.) [W.B.D]
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