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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 22 22 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 6 6 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 5 5 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 26-27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 23-25 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University). You can also browse the collection for 206 BC or search for 206 BC in all documents.

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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 28 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 16 (search)
rals, were scattered, some by desertion, others by flight, among the neighbouring states; no force remained which was notable for its numbers or its strength. So much in general for the manner in which under the command and auspices of Publius Scipio the Carthaginians were driven out of Spain in the fourteenth yearAn error corrected by x. 8 and xxxviii. 12, the 14th year of the war being 205 B.C. from the beginning of the war, the fifthLivy had assigned Scipio's arrival in Spain to the year 211 B.C.; XXVI. xix, 11 ff. Consequently he placed the capture of New Carthage in 210 B.C. See Vol. VII. notes on pp. 68, 230, 296; Scullard, 304 ff. after Publius Scipio received his province and army. Not much later Silanus returned to Scipio at Tarraco, reporting the war at an end.Although his readers would here infer that a campaign has now been completed, the historian goes on to include a seemingly impossible range of operations within what remained of the same year, 206 B.C.
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 29 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 20 (search)
Although some of these taunts were true, some half-true and hence plausible, nevertheless the motion of Quintus MetellusOf, x. 2; xi. 9 f. Consul in 206 B.C.; XXVIII. x. 2, 8. carried the day. In agreement with Maximus on the other points, he disagreed with him so far as concerned Scipio, the man whom the state chose not long before, he said, in spite of his youth as sole general to recover Spain; then, after Spain had been rewon from the enemy, elected him consul to put an end to the Punic war, and counted upon him to draw Hannibal out of Italy and to conquer Africa. How then was it logical for him, as if he were a Quintus Pleminius, suddenly to be all but condemned without a hearing, recalled from his province, although the Locrians said that the criminal acts against them of which they complained had been committed when Scipio was not even present, and nothing else could be charged against him than slowness to anger, or else reluctanceB.C. 204 in sparing his legatu
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 29 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 36 (search)
dards taken. Discouraged by defeat, Hannibal led his army back to Croton. At the same time Marcus Cornelius, the consul, in the north of Italy held Etruria in check not so muchB.C. 204 by arms as by the alarm produced by the trials,Begun in 206 B.C. under M. Livius Salinator for the punishment of Etruscan and Umbrian disloyalty; p. 43 med. Fugitives who escaped execution suffered confiscation of property (§ 12). while almost the whole land was inclined towards Mago and through him to the hoad sent others to him reporting on the disloyalty of their communities, had appeared and had been condemned. Later on men who from a guilty conscience went into voluntary exile, on being condemned in absence, eluded bodily punishment, merely exposing their property instead to possible confiscation.Begun in 206 B.C. under M. Livius Salinator for the punishment of Etruscan and Umbrian disloyalty; p. 43 med. Fugitives who escaped execution suffered confiscation of property (§ 12).
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 38 (search)
anted the Carthaginians. In addition they were not to send envoys during the period of the armistice to any other place than to Rome, and in case any envoys should come to Carthage they were not to let them go until they informed the Roman commander who they were and for what purpose they had come. With the CarthaginianB.C. 202 envoys Lucius Veturius Philo and Marcus Marcius Ralla and Lucius Scipio, brother of the general-in-command, were sent to Rome.Veturius had been consul in 206 B.C.(XXVIII. x.); Marcius, city praetor in 204 B.C. (XXIX. xiii. 2). Lucius Scipio reached the consulship with Laelius in 190 B.C. (XXXVII. i.). About that time supplies from Sicily and Sardinia lowered the price of grain so much that the merchant would leave his grain to the mariners to cover the freight. At Rome upon the first news of the Carthaginians' renewed hostilities there had been alarm, and Tiberius Claudius had been ordered to take his fleet promptly to Sicily and then to c
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 41 (search)
anded in the preceding year; Publius Aelius was to receive two legions in Sicily from Gnaeus Tremelius; Marcus Fabius was assigned for Sardinia the one legion which Publius Lentulus had held as propraetor. For Marcus Servilius, consul in the previous year, his command in Etruria was continued, likewise with his own two legions. As for the Spanish provinces, they said that for some years already Lucius Cornelius Lentulus and Lucius Manlius Acidinus had been there;I.e. since 206 B.C.(late in the year); XXVIII. xxxviii. 1; XXIX. xiii. 7; above, ii. 7. that the consuls should urge the tribunes, if it met with their approval, to bring before the people the question who by their decree should be commander in Spain. Out of the two armies the general was to enrol Roman soldiers in a single legion and Latin allies in fifteen cohorts, in order that with these he might hold the province. As for the veterans, Lucius Cornelius and Lucius Manlius were to bring them back to It