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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 22 22 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 6 6 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 5 5 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 26-27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 23-25 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh). You can also browse the collection for 206 BC or search for 206 BC in all documents.

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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 31 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 20 (search)
At the same time Lucius Cornelius Lentulus the proconsul returned from Spain. When he had given the senate an account of his vigorous and successful administration, extending over many years,Since 206 B.C. (XXVIII. xxxviii. 1). and had asked that he be permitted to enter Rome in triumph, the senate decreed that his achievements deserved the honour, but that there was no precedent handed down from antiquity that one who had not been in command as dictator or consul or praetor shnsule, pro praetore, i.e. as substitutes for magistrates. Not being a regularly elected magistrate, exercising command under auspices which he had himself taken, such a person could not be granted a triumph. Scipio had had the same experience in 206 B.C. (XXVIII. xxxviii. 4), although he had cleared Spain of Carthaginian troops. and not as consul or praetor. Nevertheless, it was proposed that he enter the city in ovation,An ovation was a minor dignity conferred on commanders who were adjud
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 32 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 2 (search)
incial governor to administer affairs in individual communities, sometimes to an official designated to oversee civil and legal administration in a town. In Italy, communities so governed enjoyed only limited privileges. Probably a person of the last class is meant here. should be sent to Gades contrary to what had been agreed upon with Lucius Marcius SeptimusMarcius, a centurion, assumed command of the Roman forces in Spain after the death of the two Scipios (Cicero, pro Balbo, 34), and in 206 B.C. concluded a treaty with the people of Gades (XXVIII. xxxvii. 10). when they put themselves under the protection of the Roman people. Also, when ambassadors from Narnia complained that the colonists there were not up to the number determined,The act establishing each colony determined the number of colonists assigned. The burdens imposed upon a colony were proportioned to the legal, and not to the actual number of colonists. and that some persons of alien race, mingling with them, were condu