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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 22 22 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 6 6 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 5 5 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 26-27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 23-25 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 206 BC or search for 206 BC in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, NEPTUNUS, ARA (search)
NEPTUNUS, ARA an altar of Neptune in circo Flaminio, the sweating of which is mentioned by Livy (xxviii. I . 4) among the prodigia of 206 B.C. The same prodigium, however, is related by Cassius Dio (fr. lvii. 60) in words that imply a real temple (I(drw=ti pollw=| ai(/ te qu/rai tou= *poseidwni/ou kai\ o( bwmo\s e)rru/h), and it is probable that such a temple did exist at that time (see below).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, QUIRINUS, AEDES (search)
21. 9) is regarded as fictitious, but in any case the temple was one of the oldest in Rome (Plin. NH xv. 120: inter antiquissima delubra habetur Quirini). Whether it stood on the site of an earlier ara (see above) cannot be determined. In front of it grew two myrtle trees, called patricia and plebeia, of which the former flourished as long as the senate retained its power unimpaired, but withered away during the Social war, while the other became healthy and vigorous (Plin. loc. cit.). In 206 B.C. the temple was struck by lightning (Liv. xxviii. II. 4), and again in 49 when it was much injured if not almost destroyed (Cass. Dio xli. 14. 3). It must have been repaired almost at once, for the senate erected in it in 45 a statue to Caesar as the *qeo\s a)ni/khtos (Cass. Dio xliii. 45. 3). A final restoration was completed by Augustus in 16 B.C. (Mon. Anc. iv. 5; vi. 32; Cass. Dio liv. 19. 4). The day of dedication of the original temple was not 29th June, the later date (Ov. Fast. vi.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, SALUS, AEDES (search)
The day of dedication was 5th August (Fast. Vall. Amit. Ant. Philoc. ad Non. Aug., CIL i². p. 240, 244, 248, 270, 324; Men. Rust. ib. 281; Fast. Ant. ap. NS 1921, 105; Cic. ad Att. iv. I. 4; pro Sest. 131). It was struck by lightning in 276 and 206 B.C. (Oros. iv. 4. I; Liv. xxviii. II. 4; cf. also Obseq. 12, 43 These prodigies chronicled by Obsequens belong respectively to 166 B.C. (lightning), and 104 B.C. (a swarm of bees). ), and burned in the reign of Claudius (Plin. NH xxxv. 19), but afteanding in the fourth century (Not. Reg. VI). In it was a statue of Cato, set up by the senate in his honour (Plut. Cat. mai. 19:nao\s th=s (*ygiei/as). The temple of Bubulcus was decorated with frescoes which, in spite of the injuries of 276 and 206 B.C., were preserved until the building was burned in the time of Claudius (Plin. loc. cit.). These frescoes were said to have been painted by a member of the gens Fabia, a C. Fabius who signed his name to his work, and won for himself and his family
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
213Temple of Mater Matuta burnt and restored, 330. of Fortuna in Forum Boarium burnt and rebuilt, 214. of Spes burnt and restored, 493. 210Forum Piscarium burnt and rebuilt, 230. Macellum burnt and rebuilt, 322. Tabernae in Forum burnt and Septem Tabernae rebuilt in following year, 504. 209Statue of Hercules by Lysippus placed on Capitol, 49. (after). Temple of Bona Dea Subsaxana, 85. 208Temple of Honos restored and Temple of Virtus added, 259. 207of Juventas vowed, 308. 206of Quirinus damaged, 439. 205of Virtus dedicated, 259. 204Stone of Pessinus brought to Rome and Temple of Magna Mater, 324. Temple of Juventas begun, 308. of Fortuna Primigenia vowed, 217. 203Clivus Publicius burnt, 124. 197Temple of Juno Sospita vowed, 291. 196of Faunus vowed, 205. Arches of Stertinius, 212, 330. 194Temple of Faunus dedicated, 205. of Juno Sospita dedicated, 291. of Veiovis in Tiber island (?), 548. Villa Publica restored and enlarged, 581. Atrium