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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 12 12 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 21 BC or search for 21 BC in all documents.

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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, HORTI LOLLIANI (search)
HORTI LOLLIANI gardens on the Esquiline, on the boundary between Regions IV and VI, as is shown by a terminal cippus that was found at the corner of the Via Principe Amedeo and the Piazza della Terme (CIL vi. 31284; NS 1883, 339; BC 1883, 220; Civilta Cattolica 1883, 210). These gardens may have belonged to M. Lollius, consul in 21 B.C., or to his daughter, Lollia Paulina, the rival of Agrippina.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PONS FABRICIUS (search)
PONS FABRICIUS the stone bridge between the left bank of the river and the island, named from its builder, L. Fabricius, curator viarum in 62 B.C. (Hor. Sat. ii. 3.35-36; and Porphyr. ad loc.; Cass. Dio xxxvii. 45). The erection of this bridge is recorded in duplicate inscriptions, over the arches on each side, and a restoration in 21 B.C. after the flood of 23 B.C. (Cass. Dio liii. 33) by the consuls, Q. Lepidus and M. Lollius, in another inscription over the arch nearest the city (CIL ia. 751=vi. 1305=31594). It is probable that this stone bridge replaced an earlier one of wood. In the Middle Ages it was known both by its official name (Not. app.; Pol. Silv. 545; Mirab. II) and as the pons Iudaeorum (Graphia 10) because it was close to the Ghetto. This is the best preserved bridge in Rome, being practically the original structure. It is built of tufa and peperino faced with travertine, part of which has been replaced with brick, and has two semi-circular arches with a smaller o
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
ol vowed, 305. Agrippa dedicates the Saepta, 460. (ca.). Temple of Juppiter Capitolinus restored, 300. 25Agrippa: builds Porticus Argonautarum, 420; Thermae begun, 518; builds Basilica Neptuni, 8 ; Horrea Agrippiana (?), 260; Temple of Bonus Eventus, 86; Stagnum Agrippae, 496; bridge, 398; Porticus Vipsania, 430. 23Library in the Porticus of Octavia, 84. (ca.). Pavement of Forum and Tribunal Praetorium, 234. 22Temple of Juppiter Tonans on Capitol dedicated, 305. 21Pons Fabricius restored after floods of 23, 400. 20Temple of Mars Ultor on the Capitol, 329. Milliarium Aureum, 342. 19Agrippa completes Aqua Virgo, 28. Altar of Fortuna Redux, 218. Second Arch of Augustus in Forum, 34. 17 Theatre of Marcellus in use, 513. 16Temple of Juventas burnt and restored, 308. Porticus round the Temple of Quirinus, 428, 439. 15Crypta Balbi, 141. Porticus of Livia begun, 423. (?) Livia builds Temple of Concord, 138. 14Temples of Juppiter Stator and Juno