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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 48 48 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 9 9 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 6 6 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 26-27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 4 4 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 2 2 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 26-27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University). You can also browse the collection for 212 BC or search for 212 BC in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 1 (search)
the whole population to Metapontum and Thurii and set fire to the city. He put to death the leading men who, he was informed, had had secret conversations with Fulvius. The Romans who had made their escape from so disastrous a battle, by different roads and half-armed sought refuge with the consul Marcellus in Samnium.There is reason to believe that Livy's authorities had duplicated the defeat of a Fulvius (with identity of place and suspiciously similar circumstances), and that this is the real event, while that in XXV. xxi. is the doublet, due to confusion between Gnaeus Fulvius Centumalus, consul in 211 B.C., and Gnaeus Fulvius Flaccus, praetor in 212 B.C. But the praetor must have suffered a shameful defeat somewhere; for the detailed account of his trial in XXVI. ii. 7 ff. and iii. for cowardice and neglect of duty could hardly be invented. Cf. De Sanctis, Storia dei Romani III. 2. 300, 459 f.; Cambridge Ancient History VIII. 81; Mommsen, Staatsrecht II3. 320 f.
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 3 (search)
At Capua meantime, while Flaccus was spending his time in selling the property of leading men, in leasing lands that had been confiscatedLands and buildings belonging to the Capuans had been added to the ager publicus of the Roman people (XXVI. xvi. 8), and Quintus Fulvius Flaccus, consul in 212 B.C., as conqueror is leasing lands and houses. His duties were later taken over by the censors, who normally had that task; cf. xi. 8. — and he leased them all in return for grain —a fresh crime fomented in secret was brought to light by informers, that he might not lack occasion for harsh treatment of the Capuans. The soldiers had been removed from dwellings, in order that houses in the city might be leased together with the land, and because Flaccus at the same time feared that the great charms of the city might weaken his army also, as they had Hannibal's. Accordingly he had compelled them to build their own shelters soldier-fashion at the gates and along the walls. Furthe
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 24 (search)
The Lake of Bolsena. was stained with blood. On account of these prodigies prayers were offered for one day. For several days full-grown victims were slain without a favourable result, and for a long time the peace of the gods was not secured. It was upon the heads of the consuls that dire consequences of the portents descended, while the state remained unharmed. The Games of Apollo had been observed for the first time in the consulship of Quintus Fulvius and Appius Claudius,I.e. 212 B.C. under the direction of Publius Cornelius Sulla, the city praetor. From that time all the successive city praetors had conducted them. But they vowed them for a single year and did not conduct them on a fixed date. That year a serious epidemic fell upon the city and the countryside, occasioning maladies, however, that were rather lingering than fatal. On account of that epidemic prayers were offered at the street corners throughout the city; and in addition Publius Licinius Varus, the
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 28 (search)
ly slung from their shoulders, as if among peaceable people; others from towers of the gate and from the walls frightened off the enemy with stones, poles and javelins. Thus Hannibal, having been ensnared by his own ruse, went away; and he set out to raise the siege of Locri, a city which Lucius Cincius was besieging with great violence by means of siege-works and with every sort of artillery brought from Sicily. For Mago,This is the Mago responsible for the death of Gracchus in 212 B.C.; cf. XXV. xvi. who no longer was confident that he would hold and defend the city, the first ray of hope came with the news of Marcellus' death. Then followed the news that Hannibal had sent the Numidian cavalry in advance and was himself following with the infantry column, making all possible speed. Accordingly, as soon as Mago knew from signals given from watch-towers that the Numidians were approaching, he also suddenly opens a gate and sallies out confidently against the ene