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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 48 48 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 9 9 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 6 6 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 26-27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 4 4 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 2 2 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh). You can also browse the collection for 212 BC or search for 212 BC in all documents.

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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 31 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 31 (search)
we had been worn out by besieging, for nearly three years, the city strongly fortified by land and sea, since now the Syracusans themselves preferred to be ruled by tyrants to being captured by us, we delivered to them a city taken and liberated by these same arms.After the death of Hieronymus, tyrant of Syracuse, Hippocrates and Epicydes, born in Carthage but descended on their father's side from a Syracusan exile, persuaded the Syracusans to join Carthage. After a three years' siege (214-212 B.C.) the city was taken by Marcellus. The Roman victory meant both the capture (captain) by the Romans and the liberation (liberatam) of the city from its foreign tyrants Hippocrates and Epicydes. See XXIV-XXV, passim. We do not deny that Sicily is our province and that the cities which were on the side of Carthage and in agreement with her made war on us are our vassals and tributaries; nay, on the contrary, we wish both you and all nations to know this, that each one's fortune is propo
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 4 (search)
en the destruction of every great empire. The better and the happier becomes the fortune of our commonwealth day by day and the greater the empire grows —and already we have crossed into Greece and Asia, places filled with all the allurements of vice, and we are handling the treasures of kings —the more I fear that these things will capture us rather than we them. Tokens of danger, believe me, were those statuesMarcellus transferred to Rome works of art captured in Syracuse in 212 B.C. and thereby began a revolution in Roman taste (XXV. xl. 2). The pun on the military meaning of infesta signa can be more easily noted than reproduced. which were brought to this city from Syracuse. Altogether too many people do I hear praising the baublesThe ornamenta brought from Corinth were usually of bronze (hence bronze dishes and small statuary were commonly called Corinthia in Rome) and from Athens painted vases. of Corinth and Athens and laughing at the fictile antefixesThe antefixa
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 6 (search)
years our matrons lived virtuous lives without it, what danger is there that when it is repealed they will rush into riotous luxury? For if it were an ancient law, or passed for the purpose of holding feminine caprice under restraint, there would be danger that its abrogation would rouse their passion; but the occasion itself will tell you why the law was passed. Hannibal was in Italy, victorious at Cannae; he already held Tarentum,Tarentum did not surrender to him until 213 or 212 B.C. (XXV. xi. 20). Arpi, Capua; he seemed ready to march on our city of Rome; our allies had deserted us; we had no troops in reserve, no naval allies to maintain the fleet, no money in the treasury; slaves were being purchased for employment as soldiers, on condition that the price should be paid their owners after the war; the contractors agreed to furnish grain and other things demanded by the war on the same settlement-day;I.e., after the war; cf. XXIII. xlix. 1-3. we furnished