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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 41 41 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 7 7 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 4 4 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 26-27 (ed. Frank Gardner Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 21-22 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 214 BC or search for 214 BC in all documents.

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e of mount Taurus, B. C. 223. Achaeus recovered for the Syrian empire all the districts which Attalus had gained; but having been falsely accused by Hermeias, the minister of Antiochus, of intending to revolt, he did so in self-defence, assumed the title of king, and ruled over the whole of Asia on this side of the Taurus. As long as Antiochus was engaged in the war with Ptolemy, he could not march against Achaeus; but after a peace had been concluded with Ptolemy, he crossed the Taurus, united his forces with Attalus, deprived Achaeus in one campaign of all his dominions and took Sardis with the exception of the citadel. Achaeus after sustaining a siege of two years in the citadel at last fell into the hands of Antiochus B. C. 214, through the treachery of Bolis, who had been employed by Sosibius, the minister of Ptolemy, to deliver him from his danger, but betrayed him to Antiochus, who ordered him to be put to death immediately. (Plb. 4.2.6, 4.48, 5.40.7, 42, 57, 7.15-18, 8.17-23.)
Andranodo'rus the son-in-law of Hiero, was appointed guardian of Hieronymus, the grandson of Hiero, after the death of the latter. He advised Hieronymus to break off the alliance with the Romans, and connect himself with Hannibal. After the assassination of Hieronymus, Andranodorus seized upon the island and the citadel with the intention of usurping the royal power; but finding difficulties in the way, he judged it more prudent to surrender them to the Syracusans, and was elected in consequence one of their generals. But the suspicions of the people becoming excited against him, he was killed shortly afterwards, B. C. 214. (Liv. 24.4-7, 21-25.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
was a Greek and probably a native of Tarentum, and was made prisoner by the Romans during their wars in southern Italy. He then became the slave of M. Livius Salinator, perhaps the same who was consul in B. C. 219, and again in B. C. 207. Andronicus instructed the children of his master, but was afterwards restored to freedom, and received from his patron the Roman name Livius. (Hieron. in Euseb. Chron. ad Ol. 148.) Andronicus is said to have died in B. C. 221, and cannot have lived beyond B. C. 214. (Osann, Anal. Crit. p. 28.) Dramatic works During his stay at Rome, Andronicus made himself a perfect master of the Latin language, and appears to have exerted himself chiefly in creating a taste for regular dramatic representations. His first drama was acted in B. C. 240, in the consulship of C. Claudius and M. Tuditanus (Cic. Brut. 18, comp. Tusc. Quaest. 1.1, de Senect. 14; Liv. 7.2; Gellius, 17.21); but whether it was a tragedy or a comedy is uncertain. That he wrote comedies as we
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
he gained possession of the chief towns of Phoenicia, but in the following year (B. C. 217), he was defeated in a great battle fought at Raphia near Gaza, and concluded in consequence a peace with Ptolemy, by which he ceded the provinces in dispute. He was the more anxious to make peace with Ptolemy, as he wished to direct all his forces against Achaeus, who had revolted in Asia Minor. In one campaign he deprived Achaeus of his conquests, and put him to death when he fell into his hands in B. C. 214, after sustaining a siege of two years in Sardis. [ACHAEUS, p. 18a.] Antiochus seems now to have formed the design of regaining the eastern provinces of Asia, which had revolted during the reign of Antiochus II. He accordingly marched against Arsaces III., king of Parthia, and Euthydemus, king of Bactria, and carried on the war for some years. Although Antiochus met upon the whole with great success, he found it hopeless to effect the subjugation of these kingdoms, and accordingly concl
Aria'nus (*)Ariano/s), a friend of Bolis, was employed by him to betray Achaeus to Antiochus the Great, B. C. 214. (Plb. 8.18, &c.) [See p. 8a
BOMILCAR 3. Commander of the Carthaginian supplies which were voted to Hannibal after the battle of Cannae, B. C. 216, and with which he arrived in Italy in the ensuing year. (Liv. 23.13, 41.) In B. C. 214, he was sent with fifty-five ships to the aid of Syracuse, then besieged by the Romans; but, finding himself unable to cope with the superior fleet of the enemy, he withdrew to Africa. (Liv. 24.36.) Two years after, we again find him at Syracuse; for we hear of his making his escape out of the harbour, carrying to Carthage intelligence of the perilous state of the city (all of which, except Achradina, was in the possession of Marcellus), and returning within a few days with 100 ships. (Liv. 25.25.) In the same year, on the destruction by pestilence of the Carthaginian land-forces under Hippocrates and Himilco, Bomilcar again sailed to Carthage with the news, and returned with 130 ships, but was prevented by Marcellus from reaching Syracuse. He then proceeded to Tarentum, apparently
Camby'lus (*Kameu=los), commander of the Cretans engaged in the service of Antiochus III. in B. C. 214. He and his men were entrusted with the protection of a fort near the acropolis of Sardis during the war against Achaeus, the son of Andromachus. He allowed himself to be drawn into a treacherous plan for delivering up Achaeus to Antiochus, by Bolis, who received a large sum of money from Sosibius, the agent of Ptolemy, for the purpose of assisting Achaeus to escape. But the money was divided between Bolis and Cambylus, and instead of setting Achaeus free, they communicated the plan to Antiochus, who again rewarded them richly for delivering Achaeus up to him. (Plb. 8.17-23; comp. ACHAEUS.) [L.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Capitoli'nus, Qui'nctius 8. T. Quinctius Pennus Capitolinus CRISPINUS. In B. C. 214, when M. Claudius Marcellus went to Rome to sue for his third consulship, he left Capitolinus in Sicily in command of the Roman fleet and camp. In B. C. 209, he was elected praetor, and obtained Capua as his province. The year after, B. C. 208, he was elected consul together with M. Claudius Marcellus, and both consuls were commissioned to carry on the war against Hannibal in Italy. In a battle which was fought in the neighbourhood of Tarentum, Capitolinus was severely wounded and retreated. He was afterwards carried to Capua and thence to Rome, where he died at the close of the year, after having proclaimed T. Manlius Torquatus dictator. (Liv. 24.39, 27.6, 7, 21, 27, 28, 33; Plb. 10.32.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or Cato the Censor (search)
warlike exploits and rigidly simple character were fresh in the memory of the old, and were often talked of with admiration in the neighbourhood. The ardour of the youthful Cato was kindled. He resolved to imitate the character, and hoped to rival the glory, of Dentatus. Opportunity was not wanting : in the school of Hannibal he took his first military lessons, namely in the campaign of B. C. 217. There is some discrepancy among historians as to the events of Cato's early military life. In B. C. 214 he served at Capua, and Drumann (Gesch. Rows, v. p. 99) imagines that already, at the age of 20, he was a military tribune. Fabius Maximus had now the command in Campania, during the year of his fourth consulshlip. The old general admitted the young soldier to the honour of intimate acquaintance. While Fabius communicated the valued results of military experience, he omitted not to instil his own personal and political partialities and dislikes into the ear of his attached follower. At th
Centumalus 3. CN. FULVIUS CN. F. CN. N. CENTUMALUS, son apparently of No. 2, was curule aedile in B. C. 214, and was elected to the praetorship while he held the former office. As praetor in the following year, B. C. 213, Suessula was assigned him as his province with the command of two legions. He was consul in 211 with P. Sulpicius Galba, and his command was prolonged in the next year, in which he was defeated by Hannibal near the town of Herdonia in Apulia, and he himself with eleven tribunes of the soldiers perished in the battle. (Liv. 24.43, 44, 25.41, 26.1, 28, 27.1; Plb. 9.6; Eutrop. 3.14; Oros. 4.17.)
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